Dreams Nabs Game Of The Year At Games For Change Awards

Illustration for article titled iDreams/i Nabs Game Of The Year At Games For Change Awards
Screenshot: Media Molecule

Media Molecule’s PlayStation 4 game-creation tool Dreams was named Game of the Year at tonight’s Games for Change Awards, which closed out the first day of the digital festival.

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Since launching in February, Dreams has allowed players to create magnificent works of art, puppet shows, breakfast, and, yes, even games with its extensive suite of design tools. Anything that democratizes game development is worthy of recognition in my book, and I can’t wait to see what folks will have managed to create in Dreams by this time next year.

Dreams wouldn’t the wonderful place it is now if it wasn’t for our incredible community of creators, innovators, and educators,” Media Molecule senior designer John Beech said after accepting the award. “It’s really them who make Dreams such a wonderful and vibrant place to be a part of.”

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Dreams was also crowned “Most Innovative” during the awards ceremony.

Other winners include Sky: Children of the Light (Best Gameplay, People’s Choice), Sea of Solitude (Most Significant Impact), Rabbids Coding (Best Learning Game), Resilience (Best Student Game), and The Holy City (Best XR for Change).

In addition to individual games, Games for Change awarded veteran game designer Gordon Bellamy with the Vanguard Award for his work championing LGBTQ+ causes during his time in the games industry.

“Gordon represents the very best of us,” Take-Two Interactive Software’s Alan Lewis said of Bellamy. “His contributions are equally plentiful and impactful. We are a far better industry and will be even moreso tomorrow because of his exceptional work and profound humanitarianism.”

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Humble Bundle also won Games for Change’s inaugural Giving Award for its years of charity fundraising.

Staff Writer, Kotaku

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DISCUSSION

armuunnokuroneko
Christine Q.

Did dreams actually manage to cultivate a following? I remember it going like a week before fizzling out in the public eye shortly thereafter