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This Tiny Tokyo Apartment Isn't So Bad

Illustration for article titled This Tiny Tokyo Apartment Isnt So Badem/em
Image: ANNnewsCH

There are some things going for it: the building is still new, clean and convenient. Big, however, it’s not.

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Japan’s ANN News visited the building, which is a year and a half old and located in Shibuya. The apartment is tiny, even by Japanese standards.

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The featured one-room measures 3-jo (畳), which means “three tatami mats.” That’s around 53-square feet.

Illustration for article titled This Tiny Tokyo Apartment Isnt So Badem/em
Image: ANNnewsCH

There is only enough space in the entryway for three pairs of shoes.

The kitchen is in the hallway, which isn’t uncommon for one-room apartments in Japan.

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Image: ANNnewsCH

Here is the refrigerator. This is a good use of space.

The washing machine is in the main room. That is, the room.

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About three people can sit in the room.

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Since the apartment doesn’t have a balcony, which most do, laundry must be hung in the room.

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There isn’t a bathtub, but just a shower. For Japanese people, that might be a big deal, because folks here usually like taking baths.

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The toilet is small. But it’s clean and not unbearable.

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There is a loft for sleeping, which is also an excellent use of space.

The monthly rent is 61,500 yen ($579), and the apartment is only five minutes from Hatagaya Station.

While small, it doesn’t make the list of Japan’s worst apartments.


Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Originally from Texas, Ashcraft has called Osaka home since 2001. He has authored six books, including most recently, The Japanese Sake Bible.

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DISCUSSION

Diversionist
Diversionist

The monthly rent is 61,500 yen ($579)

Here, they would call this inhumane and exploitative. Elsewhere they may consider it market-value. What is the attitude in Japan?