Because Japan has lots of people and not as much space, interesting housing solutions are a necessity. Some of them are cool. Some of them are terrible.

On Twitter, people are posting this year’s crappiest real estate under the tag #クソ物件オブザイヤー2017 (#kuso bukken obu za iyaa 2017 or “shittiest real estate of the year 2017"). There are some doozies, making you wonder what exactly the architect, interior designer or property owner was thinking.

Let’s have a look at the different properties.

Looks like the toilet is separated from the rest of the apartment only by a curtain.

In this apartment, the bathtub is on the balcony.

Here, the toilet is smack dab in the middle of the apartment and, oddly, can be accessed by multiple doors. Also, it’s the only way to get from room to room!

That weird, ugly looking thing in the middle is a unit bath.

This apartment has three tiny bathtubs in a row. Stairs to the second floor lead to a small alcove for the washing machine (and that’s it!).

This apartment ad asks people with the ability to sense the supernatural to refrain from renting.

You can do laundry and go to the toilet. Efficient!

I can only hope this is real.

Wash and cook next to your toilet in this tiny apartment!

Small houses went up in what was previously a parking lot, giving the adjacent apartment residents a terrible view.

The fuck.

The restroom has three toilets in it. Why?

Nothing like a bath with windows in the middle of your one room apartment.

Is this a thing?

How about a toilet right by the door?

Or a toilet at the other end of apartment?

Some kitchen!

The entrance is in the middle where the elevator is. Then, there’s a room, the toilet and shower, and the living room and kitchen. This makes my head hurt.

Once you take the stairs to the roof, you’ll find this small rooftop apartment.

This property has a giant gorilla on the roof, which doesn’t make the apartment. It makes it the best.


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