Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

The Salvaged Guts Of Old SNES Consoles Look Great Inside These New Cases

These transparent SNES shells have circulated around for a couple years. As they’re complete, Rose Colored Gaming sells them almost immediately so it’s worth keeping an eye on these beauties as they become available.

Advertisement

Instead of creating a cheap SNES emulator and housing it in a sleek new body, RCG actually uses real SNES parts. The cases themselves are laser cut from high quality translucent plastic and do a wonderful job of framing the retro hardware within.

Illustration for article titled The Salvaged Guts Of Old SNES Consoles Look Great Inside These New Cases
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled The Salvaged Guts Of Old SNES Consoles Look Great Inside These New Cases

If you’ve ever owned an SNES, you know how the grey plastic fades and discolors over time, sometimes turning your once bright and lively Nintendo console into something that looks pale and sickly. While there are plenty of options for rehabbing these old gems, RCG’s particular design for the salvaged parts is great because it lets you actually see the technology underneath and appreciate how the gadget that’s generated so many memories was put together. It also adds some extra color and nicer finishes.

From the company’s website:

“These SNES consoles* have been treated to a 100% brand new, hand-built exterior, all while retaining complete original function. Each is assembled by hand with the care and attention to detail that you have come to expect from RCG. The housing consists of laser cut and etched acrylic components which have been drilled, bent, bonded, threaded, & assembled using all new anodized aluminum hardware. Many internal components have been slathered in various finishes then etched in order to accentuate items which were never meant to be seen. All hand-built, these units will only be available in VERY limited quantities upon release, with each being treated to a unique serial number.”

Advertisement

Here’s someone at RCG actually putting one of these together:

Illustration for article titled The Salvaged Guts Of Old SNES Consoles Look Great Inside These New Cases
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled The Salvaged Guts Of Old SNES Consoles Look Great Inside These New Cases
Illustration for article titled The Salvaged Guts Of Old SNES Consoles Look Great Inside These New Cases

Kotaku staff writer. You can reach him at ethan.gach@kotaku.com

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

I still have my 1994 (had to wait a year or two; bloody delayed gratification) SNES, and it still functions. Given, my copies of Chrono Trigger and Final Fantasy VI have given up the ghost (their save batteries have, anyway), but I’d not trade out the shell of my machine for anything.

I can see why someone would, don’t get me wrong—but the marks and scuffs of age are a badge of honor for that old SNES, as far as I’m concerned. My NES served an incredible 26 years before it finally died for good; hoping the SNES lasts longer than that!