Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

The Machines That Literally Made Atari's Last Console

Illustration for article titled The Machines That Literally Made Ataris Last Console
Total RecallTotal RecallTotal Recall is a look back at the history of video games through their characters, franchises, developers and trends.

Here's something very cool: a rare look so far behind the scenes of how a video game console is made that you're seeing the very beginning. The injection moulds used to actually make the plastic components that came together to become an Atari Jaguar.

Advertisement


To recap: the Jaguar sucked, it died a horrible death, and it brought Atari down with it. But we're not here to make fun of a dead 90s console. We're here to marvel at the machinery that made them, a set of injection mould "tooling packages" that reportedly cost Atari around $250,000 to design and build.

Advertisement

From these boxes, and with the necessary plastic, you could make the casings for the console itself, a cartridge, buttons and even the exterior of the Jaguar's add-on CD drive.

In 2012, the lot of them were sold for $4500, via this eBay auction.

So what the hell were they doing still around and in one piece so long after the console ceased production? Well, that's quite the story. The moulds were sold this week by a company called Imagin Systems. Who, in a fit of brilliant opportunism, bought the kits off Atari and used them to make dental equipment.

Atari Jaguar Injection Molds [Game Sniped]

Total Recall is a look back at the history of video games through their characters, franchises, developers and trends. You'll find Total Recall stories every Tue-Fri between 1am -2am Eastern.

Advertisement

Illustration for article titled The Machines That Literally Made Ataris Last Console

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

I think it'd be interesting for developers to go back to a misunderstood older console such as Jaguar or Saturn and see just what it could do in comparison to its more popular competition. Sure, the dev tools would need a lot of work, but Jaguar could do some amazing things if the development community would just work together.

It's not a bad console, and its controller is probably one of the most underrated controllers in video game history. It's actually very comfortable to hold, and it's about the same size as an Xbox 360 controller with a Chat Pad attached. I can't help but question whether or not people who claim that the Jaguar controller is so terrible have even touched the damn thing.