Save The World By Building The Perfect Date For A Rampaging Monster

In the distant future, the world is beset by ferocious kaiju. These giant beasts threaten to destroy everything we hold dear. They are too strong to fight, which leaves only one option: romance.

In Kaiju Super Datetech, which you can play on PC, Mac, or Linux, up to ten players work together to assemble a makeshift trash robot that is sufficiently smoochable, at least by kaiju standards. By grabbing and slapping together various pieces of garbage, players need to make as big and as dashing-looking a robot as possible. If they reach the giant monster at the end of the level, that final boss will rank the robot’s “romance” level. Do well enough and you’ll have made a giant lizard happy. Fail and you might have doomed humanity forever.

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Kaiju Super Datetech’s developers Powerhoof also made Regular Human Basketball, a competitive multiplayer game in which teams controlled two massive robots try to dunk on each other. Datetech embraces that same sense of silliness but stresses the cooperative aspect instead. You might start with a hunk of metal on some wheels, but as you progress, you and your teammates will hastily toss on lips, sunglasses, bowties, and other bits of flair. The challenge is making something that will please the monster but that also won’t topple over. Since the road to the kaiju has dips and bumps, that task is harder than expected.

Often, your attempts end in wild failure.

If there’s a downside to all of the fun, it’s that Datetech’s controls take a little getting used to. Figuring out exactly how everything works takes time and can make your first few attempts frustrating. This is especially true if your robot falls over and you can’t find a way to get to get it back up. Datetech starts slow but once you get the hang of it, it is the perfect game for a party. Boot it up, get a big TV or a projector, and create some damn trash monsters. Hilarity will ensue.

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About the author

Heather Alexandra

Staff writer and critic at Kotaku.