The Movement #1 - I was skeptical about The Movement at first back when DC comics announced it as part of a pair of new series focused on the fractious class and political divides in modern-day America. These could be comics that felt horribly out of touch if the execution stumbled.

The first issueā€™s out and I can say that there are ingredients here that I like: crowd-sourced social justice that approximates how technology gets used in the real world and a cast of new characters that riff on the X-Men/Teen Titans/adolescent alienation template.

But, Simone deals her protagonists an extremely easy hand by making their milieu fictionalā€”which isnā€™t so weird since itā€™s DC and their comics generally donā€™t happen in real-world localesā€”and by making the cops and their political ecosystem seem totally reprehensible. From the little bit that we get in this first issue, Coral City makes Gotham seem like a paradise.

First issues are tricky, since they have to sell a new seriesā€™ premise in a tightly compressed way. I generally like most of Gail Simoneā€™s writing, particularly her deft hand at interpersonal dynamics and her skill sketching out her charactersā€™ emotions. Freddie Williams IIIā€™s art can run hot or cold for me. Iā€™m okay with the exaggerated faces and proportions that seem to be a hallmark of his style but the art here feels too drenched in ink. Iā€™m not sure if thatā€™s Williams, inker Thereā€™s enough here to make me want to read through the first story arc.

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Hawkeye #10 - This is the first issue of Hawkeye that I havenā€™t flat-out loved. It follows up on last issueā€™s switch in tone by introducing a character whoā€™ll likely be a new nemesis for Clint Barton and Kate Bishop. Kaviā€”the hired killer introduced in this issueā€”is a mirror image of Clint Barton: a circus orphan who becomes a skilled marksman.

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And the more disturbing subtext is that Kaziā€™s emotional hollowness echoes Clintā€™s inability to make lasting emotional relationships with women. That stuff is all good but I was missing the lighter tonal aspects that have made Hawkeye a great read. Donā€™t get me wrong: this book is still one of the best in superhero comics today. But this new chapter will probably be bringing it to a really grim place for the next few issues.


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Superior Spiderman #9 - I havenā€™t been following this book month-to-month but this issue was heavily hyped as a big one that would piss people off. In it, Slott seemingly closes a significant plot thread that seemed to be the path back to the Spider-Man status quo. (The cover is a big hint.) Thereā€™s no doubt that Peter Parker will be back in the webbed costumeā€”maybe even by the time that The Amazing Spider-Man 2 comes out in theatersā€”but the way back to that familiar ground might be a tad less predictable.


What about you? What sequences or covers from this week's comics made your eyeballs happy? Share ā€˜em in the comments below.

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