New Cyberpunk Patch Fixes The Old Cyberpunk Patch

Illustration for article titled New Cyberpunk Patch Fixes The Old Cyberpunk Patch
Screenshot: CD Projekt Red

CD Projekt Red released a patch last week that inadvertently introduced a new game breaking bug, preventing some players from finishing Cyberpunk 2077. Today it released a new patch to fix that issue, as well as address some recent problems with loot randomization.

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Out today on PC, consoles and Stadia, hotfix 1.11 updates the “Down on the Street” job, one of Cyberpunk 2077's main story quests, so that its central character will actually talk to you and let you progress through the mission. The game launched with a ton of bugs, but this one was accidently added during the clean up process.

“It occurred for some players during a holocall with Takemura, when using a save made on version 1.06 with Down on the Street quest in progress at ‘Wait For Takemura’s call’ objective,” CD Project Red writes in the brief patch notes. “After loading such a save on version 1.1, the holocall would lack dialogue options and block interactions with other NPCs.”

As a temporary workaround for the bug, which didn’t exist prior to patch 1.1's release, the studio previously suggested players speed up the in-game clock by a day to get the phone call to play properly. Unfortunately, it required players to have a save from just before the bug in order to make use of it—though at this point if you aren’t playing Cyberpunk 2077 with dozens of branching save files you must really be looking to go out in a Johnny Silverhand blaze-of-glory.

Patch 1.1 was the first of two major patches expected early in 2021 to improve the game’s performance, especially on PS4 and Xbox One. The second is due out sometime “in the weeks after” the first one. Earlier this month, CD Projekt Red co-founder Marcin Iwiński appeared in a video to personally apologize for the game’s troubled launch. A few days later, Bloomberg published a report detailing the game’s troubled development, including a rushed release date and extensive crunch conditions.

Kotaku staff writer. You can reach him at ethan.gach@kotaku.com

DISCUSSION

Hotfixes are interesting. When a dev has built up a tremendous amount of goodwill with fans, one or even four hotfixes to fix bugs introduced in a major update patch are A-OK (Stardew Valley 1.54. Computer code is an evil, possibly self-aware beast that hates its creators, but it can be brought to heel!)

When a dev has no such goodwill, “dammit, what did they break THIS time? How many fixes of the fix is this gonna take?” is the more common reaction (Cyberpunk 1.11, every update for Sims 4...)