Last Fall's Cyberattack On Capcom Compromised Personal Info On Over 16,000 People

Illustration for article titled Last Fall's Cyberattack On Capcom Compromised Personal Info On Over 16,000 People
Photo: CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / Contributor (Getty Images)
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Last November, Capcom suffered a cyberattack. As previously reported, the group claiming responsibility for the attack said they downloaded around 1TB of data, containing things like employee’s visa records, customer bank details, and internal Capcom information.

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At that time, Capcom confirmed that the personal information of nine people had been compromised in the attack. Today, Capcom updated its findings, revealing that another 16,406 people had their personal information breached in the attack, bringing the total to 16,415.

Below, via Capcom, is a breakdown of what is included in these findings:

Personal Information

16,406 people *cumulative total since investigation began: 16,415 people

  • Business partners, etc.: 3,248 people

At least one of the following: name, address, phone number, email address, etc.

  • Former employees and related parties: 9,164 people

At least one of the following: name, email address, HR information, etc.

  • Employees and related parties: 3,994 people

At least one of the following: name, email address, HR information, etc.

According to Capcom, credit card information was not included in the breach as it’s handled by an outside service provider.

The Osaka-based game company also now believes that 390,000 people, including customers and clients, could have had their personal information compromised. (This number is an increase of around 40,000 people from Capcom’s previous announcement.)

“Capcom offers its sincerest apologies for any complications and concerns that this may bring to its potentially impacted customers as well as to its many stakeholders,” the company stated in an official release.

There is currently an ongoing investigation into the cyberattack.

Originally from Texas, Ashcraft has called Osaka home since 2001. He has authored six books, including most recently, The Japanese Sake Bible.

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