Kotaku 'Shop Contest: Watch Pokémon, Winners!

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Week three of the ‘shop contest 3.0 has come and gone, so here I am to announce the winners. I asked you to hack some Pokémon into Watch Dogs 2's San Francisco and here we are, awash in elemental critters and over-exposed cityscapes.

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Of course, the winning ‘shop turned out to be Ace Stanning’s! You might remember Ace from such ‘shop contests as: that one that concluded just last weekend. While I don’t like to crown the same person twice, I had to make an exception just this once since Ace helped me realize that the world of Watch Dogs would actually be perfect for an open-world, first-person Pokémon game.

The crew from Watch Dogs already look like a bunch of wandering trainer flunkies, searching far and wide for small children to accost through fighting rare animals against one another. But while Ace made me cry for realizing another year has come and gone without a truly next-gen Pokémon, many of you made me laugh, so let’s take a quick look at some of what the rest of you turned in.

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Poké ‘shops

Illustration for article titled iKotaku/i Shop Contest: Watch Pokémon, Winners!em/em

Coriakin showed us that Pokémon and our world would never mix since they’re just to fab for this reality.

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Arayne got down to business and demonstrated just how hard it is to leave the house when your deadbolt isn’t fully rendered.

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Pikachu is on the run from a giant Poké Ball operating a crane thanks to graham2k.

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Beta Librae gives us a quick glimpse at the difficulties of fine out door dining in a world full of Pokémon.

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Mrichston shows you can always count on Lucario to keep it 100.

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It’s like MrDeadScott always said, “Don’t trust a man when his tail’s on fire.”

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Sciteach, this is impressive, but also terrifying.

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No joking around for mcbizco, revealing that the world has always been run by glitches.

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Dixie Flatline with an important reminder: never play with fire types.


And that brings us to the end of the latest ‘Shop contest. If you like what you see, keep it coming! Otherwise always feel free to drop me a line with any questions or complaints, and remember to check back tomorrow for a more seasonal ‘shop contest to set the mood going into December.

Kotaku staff writer. You can reach him at ethan.gach@kotaku.com

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DISCUSSION

Maybe this is just me, since I work for a post-production company that produces film awards shows, but it bothers me how the word “WINNER!” is placed in the cover image.

When we include visuals or any of our own production work (montage editing, transitions, music, voice overs, titles with the winner’s name and the name of their piece, or even the text “Winner” or “1st Place” or anything like that), we try to make it really obvious that our visuals are NOT part of the piece itself, for multiple reasons.

  • It can be confusing to audiences, who may mistake the presenter’s visuals for that of the artist’s.
  • It violates the creator’s intent for the piece, and obfuscates it with its own.
  • It distracts from the piece and calls to attention the presenter, who should ideally be as invisible as possible.
  • The quality of the presenter’s work may be significantly better or worse than the piece itself, conflicting with the quality of the piece.

It’s like if someone at the Louvre modified the Mona Lisa so that she’s holding a sign that says “The Most Popular Piece in the Louvre”. Not only is it tacky, but it’s also distracting attention away from the piece. That stuff belongs on a placard in front of or outside the boundaries of the content.

tl;dr: You, as the presenter, never want your informational visuals to be too tightly-integrated with the piece you’re presenting.

(Also, it just looks bad. C’mon! Where’s the negative space? Why is it riding against the bottom edge and not the top? Why’s it closer to the right than the left? Center-align the text on the bag, honestly!)