Everywhere

But what the hell is this really? Aside from the vagary of it being a game within a game, the press release notes that Everywhere and MindsEye are “two distinct triple-A products,” with the latter being an episodic adventure that will eventually feature a multiplayer component as well as a single-player campaign. Because Everywhere is this creation platform for players to build out their own experiences, similar to something like Dreams or Roblox, MindsEye can be deconstructed and reconstructed to be something else entirely. Which sounds kinda cool, except previews of Everywhere seem to suggest otherwise.

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Everywhere might be a little too late here

Everywhere starts with you creating a customizable character and sending them out into the hub world of Utropia, a metropolis with towering buildings and copious activities to participate in. Here, you can check out a variety of gameplay experiences, from Quake-like laser deathmatches to futuristic arcade racing simulators to, eventually, MindsEye. You’ll also be able to create your own activity as well as play a curated selection designed by other players. It sounds complex and interesting, though maybe a little too late to the party.

Take IGN’s preview. While the gaming publication only got to see a small snippet of MindsEye in action, IGN’s Matt Purslow did check out an extensive look at the whole of Everywhere. Initially confused by what the creation platform was supposed to be, Purslow left equally confused after five hours with BARB. Purslow noted BARB’s “impressive ambition [for a] massive scope,” but he said that the mishmash of three different games—Dreams, Fortnite, and Roblox—rendered him perplexed about Everywhere’s focus and identity.

“It’s a game creation tool but also a full, ready-made game,” Purslow said in the conclusion to his preview. “Its shooting and driving modes look underwhelming, but there’s also a seemingly impressive action game in there with AAA production values. It’s a social hub and entertainment platform that may or may not be a metaverse. It is everything, everywhere, all at once, and I’m already concerned that its ambition may exceed its grasp. And with the seemingly more flexible Unreal Editor for Fortnite having launched to an entrenched audience of 500 million (who already spend over 40% of their time in player-created spaces), I fear Everywhere may already have lost the race before it’s even approached the starting line.” Ouch.

Everywhere

There’s also Polygon’s preview, which shares a similarly wary sentiment. After spending some time with BARB in the studio’s Edinburgh location, Polygon’s Oli Welsh thought Everywhere was “a pleasant place to be.” However, he noted the core gameplay was pretty basic and “not that much fun.” While the art style also looked “rather bland,” something Welsh found “intriguing” about Everywhere was the game’s simple-yet-powerful creation tool ARC-adia, which allows players to build game content without requiring coding skills. Still, Welsh worried cramming too much into one game could leave it feeling flat.

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Kotaku reached out to Build A Rocket Boy for comment, but a company spokesperson said there are no interview opportunities available at this time.

Read More: We Aren’t Ready For What’s About To Happen With Fortnite

So, yeah, it sounds like there’s potential for Everywhere to be something compelling both mechanically and socially. However, according to the previews, the game seems to lack a real sense of individuality in a space slowly becoming oversaturated with game-creation platforms. Only time will tell how successful Everywhere will become, but at least it won’t use the blockchain or NFTs at all. Hey, you take those silver linings wherever you can get them, right?

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