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EVE Online Producers Declare Player's Attempt to Destroy Game's Economy "Absolutely Brilliant"

Illustration for article titled emEVE Online/em Producers Declare Players Attempt to Destroy Games Economy Absolutely Brilliant

In most MMOs, if a player spearheaded a public, concerted crusade to destroy the game's economy, the game's producers would find a way to put a stop to it.

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But EVE Online isn't quite like most other MMOs.

High-ranking EVE Online player The Mittani was temporarily banned from the game after an unpleasant incident where he and others relentlessly mocked a suicidal player. He immediately apologized for his words, but the damage was done.

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The Mittani is now back, after a 30-day ban, and at the forefront of a player-made event called "Burn Jita," designed essentially to attempt to topple the entire game's economy. And in EVE Online, the economy is the game.

Speaking with Eurogamer, Jon Lander, senior producer, declared, "I tell you what, it's going to be fucking brilliant, " adding that players pushing the ruleset of the game to its absolute limits is what makes it tick. "They're going to do exactly what you're able to do in the game, and people will have to roll with it. It'll be great."

Lead game designer Kristoffer Touborg agreed, explaining that player-driven events are the core of the game, and the designers are obligated—once any bugs or exploits are fixed—not to interfere. "The worst thing we could do is to stop it happening. It would be appalling for the game. It would be against everything we stand for." In the long run, he added, the inevitable shake-up would probably be actively healthy for the community.

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CCP: players' attempt to destroy Eve Online economy is "f***ing brilliant" [Eurogamer]

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DISCUSSION

Hacked-Life
Hacked-Life

A friend of mine who used to play EVE put some perspective on this that might help people understand what is happening here. In terms of World Of Warcraft - imagine if there was only one auction house for the whole game, not just per server but one that is used by EVERY server and that is virtually the only place to buy/sell goods. Now image a Guild of 10,000 members surrounded that auction house and said you can't enter without their permission. That guild could halt the selling of goods to the entire game community, or more likely charge people to use the auction house. That is essentially what is going to happen in EVE — and the developers think that is great :|