Another Akihabara Landmark Is Closing

The global pandemic has been hard on a wide range of businesses. In Japan, arcades have been hit especially hard. In August, for example, the Sega Akihabara 2nd arcade shuttered. Now, another local landmark will vanish.

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According to J-Cast News, the Adores Akihabara location will be no more. As of October 31, all of the building’s karaoke floors will be shuttered. (To be more exact, the seventh to tenth floors were in operation until October 20, with the third, fourth and fifth finishing this month.) The first and second floors, which are filled with crane games, UFO Catchers, and redemption prizes, will end service on November 8.

Akihabara photographer Kaztsu snapped photos of the notice announcing the closing of this Adores. (You can follow Kaztsu for more excellent Akihabara photos right here.)

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Adores Akihabara is located in front of JR Akihabara Station, next to the Akihabara Railway Bridge and opposite the iconic Sega Akihabara 1st arcade. If you have visited the area, you may have ventured inside to play a UFO Catcher or sing some karaoke.

This is exactly why the Akihabara YouTube channel introduced this Adores in a “Welcome to Akihabara” style clip, giving a brief tour and providing its address.

As of next month, it will be no more.

J-Cast interviewed an Adores spokesperson about the decision. The spokesperson declined to go into specifics as to why this location was closing, but conceded the impact of covid-19 and the lack of tourists. Currently, because of the global pandemic, the Japanese government has banned all tourists from entering the country.

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A member of the local Akihabara promotional association surmised that businesses relying on tourists have seen their sales drop to nearly zero, adding that before the pandemic, around half of Akihabara’s foot traffic was foreign visitors.

Tweet published with permission.

Originally from Texas, Ashcraft has called Osaka home since 2001. He has authored six books, including most recently, The Japanese Sake Bible.

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DISCUSSION

Very sad to see, I was fortunate enough to visit a couple of time a few years ago. Even won a giant Neko Atsume plush from one of their street facing UFO catchers. I wonder if there will be a big rebuilding effort after this is all over. Historically it’s always seemed like Japan’s government invested heavily in tourism initiatives, so I would hope so.