A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

So far, Kotaku has introduced an array of animal cafes in Japan: cat cafes, black cat cafes, owl cafes, bunny cafes, squirrel gardens and even penguin bars. Now, check out the country's reptile cafes.

In Japan, there isn't simply one reptile cafe. There are several, such as the Yokohama Subtropic Teahouse in, well, Yokohama, Reptile Cafe and Bar Arrive in Kobe, and Reptile Cafe Again in Osaka.

The establishments serve drinks—alcoholic and non-alcoholic—as well as food. As some readers might know, reptiles can infect folks with salmonella. According to veterinarian site DrsFosterSmith.com, "If you pick up the reptile, clean its cage, or handle any of its accessories, you are getting salmonella on your hands." So, you might want to rethink ordering cake for yourself and maybe just stick to ordering reptile food to feed the critters.

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: Another Tokyo]

According to business site Hamakei, it took Yokohama Subtropic Teahouse a year to get a license to serve food before it could open. Customers who enter the cordoned off reptile area must first disinfect their hands prior to entering and again after they leave. Below, you can see a photo from Another Tokyo of the reptile area with a disinfectant dispenser.

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: Another Tokyo]

Some of the reptiles at the Yokohama reptile cafe are behind glass, which probably makes the experience better for the animals and the visitors.

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: Another Tokyo]

Other cafes have the reptiles bring the animals to one's table. That might not be the best idea, having them slither about the table people are eating and drinking from!

While the cafes have rules about handling the animals in order to make the experience as pleasant as possible, do realize that reptiles are not domesticated or social animals like dogs and probably should not be handled more than thirty minutes a day in order not to cause the creature stress. There are warnings about the reptiles, pointing out that the customers must accept responsibility should they get bitten.

Have a look at some of the reptile cafes. That is, unless you hate snakes.

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: maiantlers]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: koujoutyou_link]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

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A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: kokoronbass]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: minematty]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: 7_yh]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: maho1024]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: wapicharock]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: saeyuki_0430]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

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A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: akuyuuu03]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: replica1403]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: spongekae]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: 6yssn9]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

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A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: rushkeke]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: mksk_0401]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: azinori398]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: 8NOSSI]

A Look Inside Japan's Reptile Cafes

[Photo: sakurainanako]

Top photo: maiantlers

To contact the author of this post, write to bashcraftATkotaku.com or find him on Twitter @Brian_Ashcraft.

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