There are certain games that just feel like they're meant to be played on a PC. Far Cry has always been one of those games—for me, at least. If you're in the same camp, Ubisoft dropped some useful info about the game's technical requirements today. Turns out the yak farm will cost you in more ways than one!

Sorry, bad joke. Yak or no yak, here are the specs Ubisoft outlined in a blog post today:

MINIMUM

  • Supported OS: Windows 7 SP1, Windows 8/8.1 (64bit versions only)
  • Processor: Intel Core i5-750 @ 2.6 GHz or AMD Phenom II X4 955 @ 3.2 GHz
  • Memory: 4GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 or AMD Radeon HD5850 (1GB VRAM)
  • Direct X: Version 11
  • Hard Drive: 30 GB available space
  • Sound Card: DirectX 9.0c compatible sound card with latest drivers

OPTIMAL

  • Supported OS: MS Windows 7 SP1, MS Windows 8/8.1 (64bit versions only)
  • Processor: Intel Core i5-2400S @ 2.5 GHz or AMD FX-8350 @ 4.0 GHz or better
  • Memory: 8GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 or AMD Radeon R9 290X or better (2GB VRAM)
  • Direct X: Version 11
  • Hard Drive: 30 GB available space
  • Sound Card: DirectX 9.0c compatible sound card with latest drivers

These are pretty middle-of-the-road for minimum requirements today, if you compare to them to some of the other major shooters that have come out in recent months—Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare and Wolfenstein: The New Order being the first two that come to mind. What stands out to me, then, is that the game's specs are surprisingly...unremarkable, especially considering how steep the ones for Assassin's Creed: Unity are. Granted, Ubisoft's other big open world game that's dropping this month is a new-gen console only game, while Far Cry 4 will still be appearing on the Xbox 360 and PS3.

Something about this discrepancy between two of Ubisoft's upcoming products leaves me feeling a little miffed, mostly because, again, Far Cry has always been the kind of game I want to play on PC more than anything else. But I guess that's assuming that super high system requirements means that a) the game will actually require the stated amount of power to run properly and b) that means it will be "better" in some way. Gamers have more than enough experience at this point to know that neither of those are true. In either case, I suppose it's nice to see that the developers are keeping last-gen gamers in mind when it comes to offering people the rare chance to ride on top of a weaponized elephant.

Now let's just see if the game is actually, you know, good.

To contact the author of this post, write to yannick.lejacq@kotaku.com or find him on Twitter at @YannickLeJacq.