Yet Another Reason The iPhone Is A Viable Gaming Platform

Illustration for article titled Yet Another Reason The iPhone Is A Viable Gaming Platform

To date, iPhone games have been largely rubbish. That's not to say the system is without potential, though. Especially when you consider there are over 30 million of them in the wild.

Announced during an Apple event yesterday, that figure includes both iPhones and the new iPod Touch, which both can run games (and other apps) from the App Store. It's a big, big number. Not as instantly significant as console sales numbers, true (since there will be people who don't game on their iPhone), but still significant.

Why? Because, unlike the generic term "mobile phones", we're not talking an immeasurable number of different devices with different capabilities spread across different companies. We're talking two devices, from the same company, which both draw their games from the same, single location.

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That streamlines development. It centralises the marketplace. Which is appealing to developers, which results in more games on the service (yes, more than the 6000 currently available), which means more people playing them.

All of which point to the iPhone becoming an ever-increasingly important games platform, rubbish games or not. Especially if you consider that, even if only a third of iPhone/iPod Touch users play games, that's still a market of over 10 million devices.

30 million iPhones sold - now that's a game platform [VentureBeat]

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DISCUSSION

Like some others here i´d sure like an officially endorsed controller attachment, too so it makes sense to adopt using it. But there are many game types that are perfectly fine to controll without dpad and buttons, too.

Despite that, the actual reason why i´m posting here is these lines by Luke:

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Why? Because, unlike the generic term "mobile phones", we're not talking an immeasurable number of different devices with different capabilities spread across different companies. We're talking two devices, from the same company, which both draw their games from the same, single location.

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Excellent, man. Had to say this. I´ve seen so many articles hyping up Android OS and the Android phones and they all missed this essential problem about those:

Each Android phone can essentially have widely different tech specs than the other. Like there´s now already one out which has touchscreen and keyboard and another which has no keyboard and is touchscreen only.

And that´s just an example, the differences can vary way more, so yeah, i think its good someone finally points out why to many developers ( like me), even knowing that maybe there could sometime be way more Android phones out there, the iphone is way more interesting to develop for.

At least here i can take way more hardware specs for granted which allows me to focus on working on the app insted of testing and tweaking for 30+ device types and their different limitations.