What Are The Actual Chances Of An Actual Uncharted Movie?

Illustration for article titled What Are The Actual Chances Of An Actual Uncharted Movie?

Uncharted, the PS3 adventure game series, is coming to the silver-screen. While the movie may not sound like Uncharted, it's got big names attached. That doesn't mean it's going to actually happen.

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Hollywood is a town where everyone is always working on something - their next project. Stars are attached to movie after movie. But just because a big star is attached and just because there's a script written, that doesn't mean a roll of film is going to be shot.

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Unlike the game industry, which is driven by individuals reluctant to talk about things they're interested in doing, things they're thinking about doing or things they might do, Hollywood is more than willing to entertain an endless array of projects. This is why hot actors end up being attached to a handful of projects at the same time.

Thing is, not all of them get made. So it's a bit like gambling with the goal being to attach oneself to as many different movies as possible in hopes that at least one of them goes into production. So much depends on boring things like schedules and money.

Certainly, there are exceptions to this rule: folks like Woody Allen or Quentin Tarantino end up making whatever they write. But they are the exception to the rule, not the rule. Remember the George Gershwin movie Martin Scorsese wanted to make? What about the Dean Martin bio he was readying? Or the one about priests in Japan? None of those films never happened. Maybe they will — one day. The director wanted to make The Last Temptation of Christ since the 1970s and finally got it made in 1988.

David O. Russell, who is slated to write and direct Uncharted, is mentioned in a handful of possible projects that include a sequel to the Fighter, a modern telling of Job as well as the movie Old St. Louis, which Russell wrote. And of course, Russell is writing Uncharted. Take your guess at which will end up as a movie!

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DISCUSSION

In the midst of all these news about video game movies I can't help but wonder why everyone so often say that it's pointless to make shot-to-shot adaptation of the game in big screen. They say that it would be essentially turn out as a pointless remake, and no-one would want to see that because the story is something they already know so well. At first this logic might sound alright, but if you really think about it, aren't most successful movies actually the ones that are not only faithful adaptations, but also movies you want to watch again and again?

For example The Lord of the Rings. They are very faithful move adaptations of the book(s) they are based to. Down to specific events and plot twists. And yet no one ever complains how the LOTR was too much like the book, too predictable. No, no. In fact most complaints I ever hear about are the changes they made to differ from the book. And even if it somehow were so that telling the same stories again in different mediums would be unpopular because the viewers already know the plot, why is it that we watch our favorite movies again and again? We certainly know the plot well enough to recite it to our friends.

Now lets take for example the Uncharted movie. All the news we hear are how David O. Russell wants to make his own thing, story torn completely apart from the established canon of Uncharted games. Famous for being not so well received in gaming community, so this tells me that I'm not completely alone with my thoughts. And yet those who agree with the changes seem to speak the same mantra we heard so many times before: "Whats the point of seeing a story we already know?" As if somehow that would really translate into worse movie experience.

When I try to look into examples of those "failed shot-to-shot adaptations", I find none (at least when it comes down to video games). Most, if not all, video game movies went with the "different story" approach. And not coincidentally most are deemed as plain awful movies. Only video game movies which had best reception (mediocre at best), are the ones with story and elements closest to the game. And even those have little to do with the original games. I'd like at least once see how would video game movie turn out as if we had "shot-to-shot" adaptation. Would it actually fail because viewers already know the story?

But that's not saying that the movies should necessarily need to be shot-to-shot adaptations to succeeding. There is another way to have faithful video game movie, and not be complete carbon copy of the original story. And that is having the story being different from the main story, but still taking place within the canon universe's domain. A untold side story if you will. That way we can have something that is original but not completely destroy the canonity of the games as the movies today tend to do.

Unfortunately however in the end that only applies to certain stories of larger scale. When it comes to stories like Uncharted, you simply cannot have the movie without having our famous game characters in it playing main part. So why not make the same story like the one in game?

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