These Super Mario and Pac-Man Dioramas Capture the Fatal Charm of Classic Video Games

Illustration for article titled These emSuper Mario/em and emPac-Man/em Dioramas Capture the Fatal Charm of Classic Video Games

Death—or its watered-down digital equivalent—was never too far-off in the arcade classics of yesteryear. Whether it's angry ghosts in primary colors from Pac-Man or a missed jump in Super Mario Bros, players never forgot that they were surrounded by end-of-life scenarios.

Maybe that awareness is what makes these game-focused creations from California artist Senor Chips so great. His work riffs off the traditional Day of the Dead dioramas called calacas and touches on other pop cultural favorites like Tron, Hello Kitty and South Park. Nerd collective Iam8bit will be showcasing Chips' work in a free gallery show that opens this Friday.

Halloween's right around the corner. So, this is the perfect place to be if you've got a craving to look at a little skull-headed version of Charlie Brown miss out on kicking the football. Turns out that's a pretty great thing to see.

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Hecho en el Norte [Iam8bit]

Illustration for article titled These emSuper Mario/em and emPac-Man/em Dioramas Capture the Fatal Charm of Classic Video Games
Illustration for article titled These emSuper Mario/em and emPac-Man/em Dioramas Capture the Fatal Charm of Classic Video Games
Illustration for article titled These emSuper Mario/em and emPac-Man/em Dioramas Capture the Fatal Charm of Classic Video Games
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Illustration for article titled These emSuper Mario/em and emPac-Man/em Dioramas Capture the Fatal Charm of Classic Video Games

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DISCUSSION

FrankieViturello
FrankieViturello

Man, I hate to be this guy opening this potential can of worms, but what's the deal with the one with the moviegoers watching Batman?

Is that some type of normal, tasteful pop-culture reference to something that I'm not getting, or is it an attempt to play off of the Colorado Batman shootings from this year (since these are all "Day of the Dead" style arts/crafts pieces similar to what you'd find in a Mexico tourist shop).

Is the artist going with the inherent death theme there, or is there something that I'm missing.

Also, regardless of it's level of tastefulness, I'm not strictly opposed to the notion of art being emotionally provoking/controversial in that manner, I'm really just curious about the subject matter in that specific one.