The Windows In Watch Dogs Look Into An Alternate Reality

Illustration for article titled The Windows In emWatch Dogs/em Look Into An Alternate Reality

There's a secret world hidden behind the windows of Chicago in Watch Dogs.

In future Chicago, one computer program controls everything in the city, from the power grid to rocking horse rides. There are other strange things about the city as well, like how every window reflects some mysterious bizarro city made almost entirely of straight roads.

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Illustration for article titled The Windows In emWatch Dogs/em Look Into An Alternate Reality
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You're standing on a hotel balcony with a big neon sign outside. You look in the window, and BAM, youre looking into an intersection.

Illustration for article titled The Windows In emWatch Dogs/em Look Into An Alternate Reality

You're standing in front of an office building by a statue, and you look in the window —BOOM — intersection.

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Driving your car parallel to some shop windows, INTERSECTION

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There's even an alternate world inside some buildings (via reddit):

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What's this alternate reality Chicago like? There aren't any people there, so maybe it's more peaceful. Or maybe that's what it looks like after ctOS kills all the humans.

There is one hint — one of the studios that worked on the game? Ubisoft Reflections.

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DISCUSSION

As I mentioned in another thread, WD is very much a pared-down (but prettier—apart from those god-awful reflections) version of GTA V (running at ultra spec on my PC, anyhow). It's not a -bad- game—it's just aggressively mediocre and wholly unabashed about not only being derivative as hell, but about making its one stand-out gimmick (the hacking) obnoxiously repetitive and uninspired (apart from camera surfing to blow up grenades on the belts of guards—that bit's cool).

I'm going to play it to its conclusion because I'm one of the doofs who pre-ordered it on Steam, but I'm having trouble working up enough fucks to give to play it for more than an hour at a time.

In some ways, WD shows a lot of promise—there are good ideas in here that got stirred into a mix of slacker bullcrap in the hopes that the resultant slurry would be palatable—and I can only hope the inevitable sequel (because the game sold like gangbusters ahead of the review embargo; thanks for the heads-up on future product PR, there, Ubi) lives up to what the first entry could have been.