The Ghost of Gaming Future

Illustration for article titled The Ghost of Gaming Future

The topic for this month's Blogs of the Roundtable has led to some fantastically diverse answers: "What role will gaming play in your familial relationships in 5 years? 10 years? 20 years?".

They're all good reads — here's one sample from Write the Game:

Families will have more in common, sharing triumphs and losses in video games. Kids will play with their parents, and everyone will have fun.

Conversely, many parents will stick their children in front of a PS3 to shut them up, whilst kids will find an easily accessible fantasy world in which to drown their fledgling identities.

Like everything else, a balance will have to be struck. Commercialism and arty experimentation will both clash with and compliment each other. Private joys will have to be placed against the thrill of being part of a well-oiled team. Mass victory will be accompanied by sessions of the blame-game.

There is one thing we can be sure of - it won’t be boring.

The entries range from standard musings to dystopian visions of the future; the monthly entries for Blogs of the Roundtable are always worth keeping an eye on, especially as they tend to trickle in over the course of the month.

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The Ghost Of Gaming Future [Write the Game via Blogs of the Roundtable/Man Bytes Blog]

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DISCUSSION

"Conversely, relationships will become more shallow. Friendships will be forgotten over loot disputes, we'll have 2000 people befriended on each of our gaming profiles, and we'll never know anyone's real name."

I won't. Maybe I'm just picky, but there's no way I'd have 2,000 friends on any gaming profile. I like playing with people I know in real life, people I can chat with during a game about inside jokes and things completely unrelated to gaming, people I can eat lunch with the next day. On the other hand, I've got no qualms about adding someone I don't know to my friends list after a few good games, but I'd have to get to know them a bit. I guess what I'm saying is that I'm not the kind of guy that'll add everyone on my computer-matched team just because we won a round.