Steam Sales Data For 2015

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Sergey Galyonkin, who runs Steam Spy, is the internet’s top man for getting data on Valve’s marketplace. Which makes his summary of 2015 salesoverall sales, not just the seasonsal Steam sales—some interesting reading.

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While his data isn’t 100% accurate (it’s gathered using “statistical analysis” rather than actual figures from Valve), Steam Spy is for the most part pretty damn close, so disclaimers aside, the numbers are worth looking at.

Galyonkin’s key findings are:

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That despite fears over an “indiepocalypse”, ie the service being buried beneath an unsortable mass of new video games, over the latter half of 2015 the number of new games being released on Steam actually flatlined.


Illustration for article titled Steam Sales Data For 2015

December is the dominant sales month, obviously, but April was #2 in terms of revenue. Thank Grand Theft Auto V’s PC release for that.


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Illustration for article titled Steam Sales Data For 2015

A collection of monthly sales charts from April onwards shows that people sure loved Fallout 4, GTA V and Valve’s games. And ARK: Survival Evolved. Check November’s charts and you’ll also see one of the reason’s Assassin’s Creed is taking a break in 2016.

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And finally, the annual sales chart comes in two flavours: revenue and units sold. The revenue one has some problems, not least that it doesn’t actually cover all of 2015, but take a moment to look up and down the one on the right (units sold): it reads like a pretty decent GOTY list, which is neat for a sales chart.

You can read the full rundown here.

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DISCUSSION

Just to point out, a slight dip in game releases during December (typically a down month for releases as everything is out and being bought) doesn’t mean the indiepocalpse isn’t happening. There were over 250 new titles releases in December of 2015 alone, even if we assume that includes DLC, that’s a shitload of new games/DLC. Additionally, a slight dip at the end of an upward curve does not necessarily mean said curve is done increasing. Even if we assume things will flatline a bit, that’s still a lot of games content to sift through, and as more and more titles show up it might bury high quality titles. The indiepocalypse isn’t just about the idea that the number of releases will continuously go up, but that the market will become so flooded with indie content that indies will have their own little mini games crash because there is too much garbage being put out trying to cash in on the potentially high margins. I’m not saying the Indiepocalypse will happen for sure, but the idea that indie developers can breath a sigh of relief because everything is fine now is probably not true.