Pop Stars Move Kinect In Japan

Illustration for article titled Pop Stars Move Kinect In Japan

Microsoft doesn't view Kinect simply as just some peripheral. It's as important as a console. That's why the company poured millions into launching Kinect. And as expected, Xbox 360 sales saw a spike in Japan.

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Xbox 360 sales actually tripled. But that wasn't big enough for the console to overtake the DSi. Or the DSi XL. Or the Wii. Or the PS3. Or the PSP. For the week dating from November 11 to November 21, the Xbox 360 sold 7,083 units in Japan. The previous week, Microsoft only sold 2,149 units.

In comparison, the DSi, the DSi XL, the Wii and the PS3 all sold over 20,000 units each — with the Wii and PS3 selling 27,851 and 29,058 respectively. (The PSP sold over 96,000 units!)

Illustration for article titled Pop Stars Move Kinect In Japan

So, even with all those Kinect ads on televisions and Xbox Japan's marketing push, the company was only able to 7,000 consoles sold. It is worth noting that Kinect went on sale on November 20, so this week should also see a bump in Xbox 360 sales. However, with Gran Turismo 5 going on sale in The Land of the Rising Sun, expect a PS3 bump, too.

However, none of the games released for Kinect broke the software top 20 chart. The 20th game on the Japanese software sales chart is Winning Eleven 2011 (Pro Evo Soccer) for the Wii, which sold 8,105. That means that the biggest selling Kinect title sold less than that. Sales of Kinect as a stand alone are definitely likely to be higher than Xbox 360 software and console sales.

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Some Japanese sites are reporting that Kinect sold 16,911 stand alone units in its first week with retailers saying its moving more than initially thought. Couple that with Xbox 360 Kinect bundles, and there is the beginnings of a Japanese installment base — though, certainly nothing like Kinect sales in the U.S. or Europe. But it's decent enough for Japan.

In the U.S., Microsoft sold over a million Kinect units in its first ten days on sale.

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Over 150 gamers lined up for Kinect's Akihabara, but reports of the peripheral drawing long lines elsewhere were scarce.

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Illustration for article titled Pop Stars Move Kinect In Japan
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To promote the game, Microsoft used members of popular schoolgirl idol group SKE48. Does that mean these girls weren't able to parlay their idol status into Kinect or Xbox 360 sales?

Well, Microsoft did end up tripling console sales. Then again, Microsoft typically occupies the basement of the Japanese sales charts, along with the PSPgo and the PS2.

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Japan might seem lukewarm towards Kinect and the Xbox 360, but it's still very much keen on SKE48. The group's newest single, "1!2!3!4! Yoroshiku!", was used as the theme song in the Japanese Kinect ads.

The single was released on November 17 and (at the time of posting) is number two on the Japanese charts, selling nearly 120,000 copies. The group held handshaking events to promote the tune, and over 3,000 fans appeared at one meet-and-greet event in Yokohama with all SKE48 members!

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Of course, CD singles are way cheaper than game hardware — but Sony and Nintendo just sold a bunch of handheld and home game consoles without a nationwide commercial campaign that employed two popular idols.

Illustration for article titled Pop Stars Move Kinect In Japan
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So is an event at which two SKE48 members appeared that drew 150 people a success or failure? Microsoft increased Xbox 360 sales and launched Kinect in Japan, but at what cost and for how long?

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DISCUSSION

skygoing
Skygoing

I don't understand how people can be saying, "better luck next time," in the context of this post. MS hit Japan with a marketing campaign designed to increase sales and they tripled their sales just after it. I also don't understand the "not by much" comment on the post itself, "or the" sarcastic, "Or the"s in the post. If I was selling a product and the sales tripled just after a marketing slant I was working, I'd say the marketing was a success and be pretty stoked about it.

The blog post could have just as well played the angle that MS is still trying to get Japan interested in the 360/Kinect and recently found a way to increase sales. It could have said that MS is still willing to invest a lot in its advertising in Nippon and may be learning a thing or two that works but only time will tell. We all know that MS is not competing against the Nintendo or Sony right now, but (as scrapking mentioned below) that shouldn't qualify it as a failure either.

If MS shows that they can continue to learn about how to increase sales and market effectively/create interest in Japan and 20 years from now they have a system that is selling on par with the others there, will people look back and say, "remember the 360?! What a failure!" No, they'll say it helped "pave the way" or that MS learned through mistakes and missteps how to succeed in this market.

Finally, why are handheld sales always in charts and comparisons with consoles? Aren't they entirely different beasts? Is it because they all play games? Shouldn't we include PC games or video cards in the charts too then? At what point to we add smart phones and tablets, if we aren't going to differentiate by the KIND of device it is?