Panic Buying In Osaka After Today's Earthquake

Illustration for article titled Panic Buying In Osaka After Todays Earthquakeem/em
Photo: Ashcraft (Kotaku )

This morning, Osaka was rocked by a 6.1-magnitude earthquake. There have been at least three casualties, including a 9-year-old girl who was killed while walking to school, and according to The Guardian, hundreds of people were injured in the quake.

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Below are clips of Osaka and Kyoto when the earthquake hit.

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In Osaka Prefecture and neighboring Hyogo, over 170,000 households are now without power.

Some local supermarkets are closed. The ones that are still open are experiencing the effects of panic buying, no doubt with many worried about aftershocks or a bigger earthquake.

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Illustration for article titled Panic Buying In Osaka After Todays Earthquakeem/em
Photo: Ashcraft (Kotaku )
Illustration for article titled Panic Buying In Osaka After Todays Earthquakeem/em
Screenshot: Ashcraft (Kotaku )
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Illustration for article titled Panic Buying In Osaka After Todays Earthquakeem/em
Screenshot: Ashcraft (Kotaku)

Bread, instant ramen, microwavable food and water are being snapped up. In many of the areas hardest hit, the shelves are bare. Other types of food, thankfully, and things like tea still appear to be widely available at supermarkets and convenience stores.

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“We may have to consider the possibility of even greater earthquakes following, as happened in the quakes in Kumamoto,” Shinji Toda, an earthquake geology professor at Tohoku University, told Kyodo (via The Guardian).

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That’s not comforting.


Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Originally from Texas, Ashcraft has called Osaka home since 2001. He has authored six books, including most recently, The Japanese Sake Bible.

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DISCUSSION

Impressive how things and people hold up. If this were anywhere else in the world with such a population density it would have been 1000 times worse.

As for the panic buying, I wouldn’t call it panic, people buy what they need before shops run out of stock (no restocking because of transport issues)