Gif: 2ch
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It’s become expected that the disc release of an anime will go back and fix any spotty animation that the show let slide during the broadcast. That’s not always the case!

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As pointed out on 2ch, Japan’s largest bulletin board, the Blu-ray release of The Quintessential Quintuplets (Gotoubun no Hanayome) didn’t exactly clean up some of the bad animation of character Nino Nakano. (Later episodes had better quality animation, but the earlier episodes were rather rough.)

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Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime
Image: 2ch
Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime
Image: 2ch
Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime
Image: 2ch

See? There are changes, especially in the last image, but they are minimal and are in stark contrast to more extreme overalls we’ve previously seen (for example, below). Perhaps, that’s because the show needed less work?

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Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime
Image: 2ch
Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime
Image: 2ch
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Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime
Image: 2ch

There is a precedent for this—for example, the disc release of My Sister, My Writer. See how it stacks up with the original broadcast (disc release is on the left, while the broadcast original is on the right).

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Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime
Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime
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Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime
Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime
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Illustration for article titled Not All Blu-ray Releases Overhaul Anime

Originally from Texas, Ashcraft has called Osaka home since 2001. He has authored six books, including most recently, The Japanese Sake Bible.

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