After TV Anime Shamed Online, Bad Parts Get Fixed

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When some anime first appear on television, parts of the actual animation might not be quite up to snuff. Fans notice this and even complain. This was certainly true of Gonna be the Twin-tail!!

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Last December on 2ch, Japan’s largest net forum, two images from the TV broadcast were pointed out as being especially clumsy and bad. “Terrible,” wrote one commenter. “This is like something I could do,” wrote another.

In particular, this image:

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And this one:

Illustration for article titled After TV Anime Shamed Online, Bad Parts Get Fixed

But as Twitter user Arutosu note, the home release (see below) fixes these images to the point where some people online are saying this is like a completely different anime. I don’t agree with that, but the tweaked art does look better, especially for the character Erina Shindo.

Here, via Arutosu, is a comparison:

TV Version

Illustration for article titled After TV Anime Shamed Online, Bad Parts Get Fixed
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DVD Version

Illustration for article titled After TV Anime Shamed Online, Bad Parts Get Fixed
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TV

Illustration for article titled After TV Anime Shamed Online, Bad Parts Get Fixed
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DVD

Illustration for article titled After TV Anime Shamed Online, Bad Parts Get Fixed
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As any anime fan will be quick to point out, this sort of thing isn’t new (examples here and here) and helps ensure diehard fans buy the DVDs and Blu-rays. I am glad stuff gets fixed for the home release, but it makes you wish animators had a little more time to get everything just so for the original broadcast. But with their gruelling schedules and paltry pay, that might not be possible.

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To contact the author of this post, write to bashcraftATkotaku.com or find him on Twitter@Brian_Ashcraft.

Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

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DISCUSSION

Shirobako should be mandatory viewing for today’s anime fans. I know that after I watched it, I find myself being much more sympathetic to TV-broadcast anime, just because of how absolutely grueling it can be to complete an episode and push it out on time. You can still say that stuff like this is “inexcusable”, but people who publicly bash shows/their animators for this kind of thing need to try to understand the struggles of the people working on it.