Kotaku EastEast is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.  

This the Orifuji. It’s the most polite toilet paper dispenser you’ll find and further proof that Japanese restrooms really are terrific.

Joining the ranks of heated seats, potties that play music, and commodes that have night lights is a new toilet paper dispenser that automatically cuts the toilet paper so you don’t have to tear it off yourself and then folds the corners for the next person.

Thanks to sensors, the dispenser automatically cuts the toilet paper when you’re done pulling what you need and makes the next piece presentable. The contraption can handle different kinds of toilet paper with ease.

Perhaps more amazing than the product itself is that ten Japanese companies joined forces to create the Orifuji. Ten!

Often at hotels and restaurants in Japan, staff manually fold the corners of the first piece of toilet paper in into a triangle. The reason is more than just that it looks nice and neat.

Advertisement

[Photo: nuguhuhorisu]

[Photo: ytr_SG_Rockets]

Advertisement

[Photo: makimaki1101]

In the past, “triangle folding” was one way custodians made sure they had cleaned a particular stall. So, if a Japanese person were to enter a washlette in a restaurant and the toilet paper was torn and not folded neatly, they might think the toilet is unclean.

Not every place does this, sure, but when you see it, you know that someone really cares about small details. In the toilet.

Advertisement

[Photo: 08mayuka04]

Advertisement

[Photo: 106oku]

Even at some people’s houses in Japan, you might see the top square of toilet paper has been folded into a triangle.

And now, folding the corners of toilet paper has never been easier. Good.

To contact the author of this post, write to bashcraftATkotaku.com or find him on Twitter@Brian_Ashcraft.

Advertisement


Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.