Japanese City Features Slowpoke On Postal Truck And Mail Box

Illustration for article titled Japanese City Features Slowpoke On Postal Truck And Mail Box
Image: ©2021 Pokémon. ©1995-2021 Nintendo/Creatures Inc./GAME FREAK inc.
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Slowpoke might not exactly be the image postal carriers are going for, but in Japan, the sluggishly cute Pokémon is known as Yadon, and... well, let me explain.

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Since the character’s Japanese name sounds like “udon,” the character has been promoting the famous noodle dish in Kagawa Prefecture since 2015. If you ever visit the prefecture, do eat its famous noodle dish.

Illustration for article titled Japanese City Features Slowpoke On Postal Truck And Mail Box
Image: ©2021 Pokémon. ©1995-2021 Nintendo/Creatures Inc./GAME FREAK inc.

Now in the city of Takamatsu, there’s a Slowpoke mailbox and a Slowpoke mail truck, to promote delicious udon in Kagawa and not slow mail. The postbox is covered in udon art and inscribed with “Yadon Udon.”

Illustration for article titled Japanese City Features Slowpoke On Postal Truck And Mail Box
Image: ©2021 Pokémon. ©1995-2021 Nintendo/Creatures Inc./GAME FREAK inc.

On the mail truck, however, it’s written “Yadon Paradaisu” (Slowpoke Paradise) in Japanese and features a relaxing Yadon as well as a group of fellow Pocket Monsters holding letters.

Illustration for article titled Japanese City Features Slowpoke On Postal Truck And Mail Box
Image: ©2021 Pokémon. ©1995-2021 Nintendo/Creatures Inc./GAME FREAK inc.
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The official press release points out that the mailbox functions like a regular one, so the assumption is that this sticker-covered mail truck does, too.

I’m sure the postal carriers in Takamatsu are no slowpokes!

Illustration for article titled Japanese City Features Slowpoke On Postal Truck And Mail Box
Image: ©2021 Pokémon. ©1995-2021 Nintendo/Creatures Inc./GAME FREAK inc.

Originally from Texas, Ashcraft has called Osaka home since 2001. He has authored six books, including most recently, The Japanese Sake Bible.

DISCUSSION

Every time the subject of udon comes up in media, whether something like Kotaku East or a food/cooking site, I’m reminded of the hilarious moment on the original Japanese Iron Chef—Chairman Kaga had a strong distaste for the theme ingredient in the Udon Battle, which got him some gentle teasing from the panel of judges.