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Inside One of Japan's Oldest Restaurants

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You like noodles, right? I sure do. Especially soba noodles. And Kyoto's Honke Owariya is famous for its soba noodles. That, and being very, very old.

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Honke Owariya was established in 1465. The restaurant started out making confectionery, but its noodles proved more popular. According to Deep Kyoto, Honke Owariya has been making soba for "only" the past three or four hundred years. Those with a sweet tooth will be happy to know that it still makes desserts.

"Soba" noodles are made with buckwheat flour and wheat flour. They can be eaten hot or cold, depending on the season. Japan Travel reports that the restaurant uses the "freshest" Kyoto spring well water to make its delicious soup broth.

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This is the noodle restaurant that the Japanese imperial family eats at when it returns to Kyoto from Tokyo. Bowls of hot soba start at 756 yen. You can see the restaurant's menu in English right here.

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Honke Owariya Noodle Restaurant [Japan Travel]

Honke Owariya with Sean Lotman [Deep Kyoto]

Top photo: posomasa

To contact the author of this post, write to bashcraftATkotaku.com or find him on Twitter @Brian_Ashcraft.

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Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

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DISCUSSION

popsiclezeratul
popsiclezeratul

You know, if there's one thing I can say that anime has impressed on me through the years, it's a growing love and appreciation for Japanese noodles. They're always shown and animated in such a mouthwatering fashion. Ramen, udon, soba, yakisoba - you name it, they look delicious. And then you get an actual serving of them, and they look and taste even better than you think they do on screen! These pics just make me hungry. I could really go for a serving plate filled with soba noodles, or some tsukemen, with some tempura shrimp on the side.