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Fan-Made Half-Life 3 Is Coming Along Nicely

Illustration for article titled Fan-Made iHalf-Life 3/i Is Coming Along Nicely

Last year, a group of Half-Life fans announced that they were going to be taking former Valve writer Marc Laidlaw’s Episode 3 synopsis and turning it into an actual game. A year later and things are looking good!

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The team behind Project Borealis have released this update video that shows all the work they’ve been able to do so far, ranging from concept art to level design to physics trickery, which is my favourite because look what they’ve done to the Gravity Gun:

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I’m also very into the fluffy arctic headcrabs:

There’s a complete rundown of where they’re at here:

While there’s a full (and obviously still very much work-in-progress) gameplay showcase here:

Luke Plunkett is a Senior Editor based in Canberra, Australia. He has written a book on cosplay, designed a game about airplanes, and also runs cosplay.kotaku.com.

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DISCUSSION

Just because it crops up every time Kotaku reports on a fan project, I feel the need to say this:

If anyone out there genuinely believes it is Kotaku’s coverage of a fan project that slaps said project with a corporate C&D, then the folks who believe that are in desperate need of a reality check.

Any IP that’s able to generate a significant revenue stream has a bloody horde of lawyers that specialize in IP protection attached to it. While they may not be able to monitor all channels at all times, the idea that they’d fail to grok a major fan project with a significant following until it turned up on Kotaku is absolutely facile.

The net’s a big place, and there’s an awful lot of areas to hide in, but none of them are so deep nor so dark that they’ll avoid the meteor-strike that is a C&D, particularly if the target of that C&D might be generating significant cash.

TL;DR: This project looks cool as hell, and while I hope it doesn’t get shut down, it probably will—because failure to protect IP from infringement weakens protection for that IP in future litigation—but if it does, it won’t be the fault of this article.