Illustration for article titled Discord Ups Livestream Limits Because Of Coronavirus

Discord’s Go Live streaming and screen sharing features normally has a limit of 10 users, but for the “next few months” that’ll be increased to 50 to accommodate folks who want to “keep in touch” (or do work/schoolwork) while under coronavirus shutdown.

The company announced the increase earlier today, saying it’ll last “while it’s most critically needed”.

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In a fuller statement written on Discord’s blog, founder Jason Citron writes:

We’re following news of COVID-19 as closely as you are, and our hearts go out to those who’ve been impacted. We also know that many people who aren’t directly affected by the virus have still seen their lives disrupted, including school closures, canceled community gatherings and small businesses struggling to keep operations running smoothly.

We’ve heard from so many of you over the past few weeks. People — particularly in regions harder hit by COVID-19 — are already using Discord to keep in touch and stay on track with their everyday lives, from attending classes remotely to working from home.

We wanted to find a way to help, so we’re temporarily upping the limit on Go Live to 50 people at a time, up from 10. Go Live is free to use and lets people privately stream or screen share apps from a computer while others watch on any device — so teachers can conduct a class, co-workers can collaborate, and groups can still meet. You can learn more about how to get started with Go Live here.

While we created Discord to bring people together around games, we’re thrilled that so many of you are using it in so many different ways. We’ll maintain the higher user limit as long as it’s critically needed — we hope it makes peoples’ lives just a little easier and a little less stressful day-to-day.

Finally, because we anticipate a surge in demand for Go Live, we hope you’ll be patient if you happen to encounter any performance issues.

Very cool, Discord.

Luke Plunkett is a Senior Editor based in Canberra, Australia. He has written a book on cosplay, designed a game about airplanes, and also runs cosplay.kotaku.com.

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