Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

Bootleg Console Maker Blatantly Copies the iPhone 6

Illustration for article titled Bootleg Console Maker Blatantly Copies the iPhone 6
Kotaku EastEast is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

The Chinese company best known for making knock-off Super Nintendo consoles is back again, this time with a mighty fine looking phone.

Advertisement

97973.com, the mobile-centric version of Chinese gaming news site 17173.com, reports the once console maker, Subor, is now making iPhone clones under its Little Tyrant brand.

Back in the early days of console gaming in China, before the ban, Subor created the Tyrant, a bootleg of the Nintendo Entertainment System and the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. The consoles were sold under the Little Tyrant brand.

Advertisement

Little Tyrant, to many Chinese gamers, was an introduction to console games. They were cheaper than imported consoles and played bootlegged cartridges.

Subor's newest product, however, is in line with what it's been working on recently—mobile phones. What makes this new mobile phone, the X7, special is that in terms of outward appearances, it looks just like an iPhone, and not just any iPhone, but the iPhone 6.

Illustration for article titled Bootleg Console Maker Blatantly Copies the iPhone 6
Advertisement

Just looking at the product shots, the thing screams the gold iPhone, the most popular color in China. They even threw in a "touch ID" ring, no doubt a non-functional one.

Illustration for article titled Bootleg Console Maker Blatantly Copies the iPhone 6
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Bootleg Console Maker Blatantly Copies the iPhone 6

In terms of specifications, the Subor runs Android 4.2.2, sports a five-inch 720p screen, a quad-core 1.3 Ghz processor, and 1 gb of ram. Per China norm, the phone is a dual sim.

Advertisement

Unfortunately 97973's report doesn't go into the phone's gaming capabilities. There's no doubt in my mind that the thing will be filled to the wazoo with illegal emulators. Regardless of all that, the phone does look good. The biggest kicker is that the phone costs 699 RMB ($112). There's no word if there will be a 6 Plus version of the phone.

Images: MyDrivers.com va 97973.com
小霸王手机售价699 造型与iPhone 6完全一致 [97973]

Kotaku East is your slice of Asian Internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Advertisement

Eric is a Beijing based writer and all around FAT man. You can contact him @FatAsianTechie@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter @FatAsianTechie

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

Just a little insight into how a lot (not all) of "clone" companies start/exist in china:

Each year, annually [read: end of contract] major companies and corporations alike will house what is know as "manufacturer bidding" for whatever it is they need made - be it a part or an entire product between multiple factories.

When a factory wins, partly due to lowest cost, partly due to competency, they will be awarded to make your new iphone/PS4/TV what have you.
The factory would already have most of whatever equipment it needs to produce said item, and merely needs a supply order and template to produce said items. Both which are given under contract and remains whatever corporation's property.

> Factory produces said item at X volume for company.
> unit ships to supply and eventually end in consumers hands
> New order of units is placed
> bidding starts again at end of determined contract (could be units shipped, or allotted time)

This time, say, another factory wins favour; part in due to EVEN CHEAPER labour.
The cycle continues... or does it?

Look back.
Now we have an entire factory capable of producing an "insert smartphone here"
With all the materials and all the equipment set up, but no orders to fill. The other factory won the bid.
They are, of course, to liquidate said materials and layup as per contract termination.

But that would mean everyone would be out of a job - and contracts are hard to come by when it's an dog-eat-dog world.

Alas, we've come to the "cloning" business. Why not? There is no law against it in China, not one that is enforced, anyway.
Now these people have a job again - making the "exact" same thing to boot! Except now they get to keep all the profits. Perfect, right?

Well, at the least, that's how they see things.
Here in the west; we scratch our heads and wonder why so many clones of things pop up all over in China... and how exactly DID they manage to clone it so quickly and to exact dimensions?

A mystery no more.