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An Accidental Ghost In The Shell Live-Action Movie Reminder

[Image: Eiga.com]
[Image: Eiga.com]
Kotaku EastEast is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Of course the Ghost in the Shell manga’s original publisher never thought a Japanese actor would play the lead in the Hollywood version. But at a publicity event for the film in Tokyo, we get a look at what that might’ve been, if the movie had been made in Japan.

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Even if that’s within the context of staged PR! It’s not uncommon for Japanese celebrities to cosplay for Hollywood movie events. We have that here as well as other subtext.

Of course, Beat Takeshi still would’ve been in the movie, and don’t take this as finalized casting decisions, but it is interesting to see locals bring these characters to life.

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Via Eiga.com, here’s Rina Takeda as the Major.

[Image: Eiga.com]
[Image: Eiga.com]

She’s not only a talented actresses, but also a black belt and able to do things like this:

[GIF via YouTube]
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And this:

[GIF via YouTube]
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In her movies, Takeda does her own stunts, which are free of wire work and CG.

Via Natalie, that’s Korean-Japanese pro wrestler Riki Choshu as Batou.

Illustration for article titled An Accidental iGhost In The Shell /iLive-Action Movie Reminderem/em
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It took two hours of make up to pull off this look.

[GIF: Oricon]
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Looks good, no?

[GIF: Oricon]
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Choshu says he can’t see a thing.

[GIF: Oricon]
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And she’s unloading those kicks in heels.

[GIF: Oricon]
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Well done. Take a bow!

In case you missed it, check out io9's Ghost in the Shell review right here.


Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Originally from Texas, Ashcraft has called Osaka home since 2001. He has authored six books, including most recently, The Japanese Sake Bible.

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DISCUSSION

Honestly at this point, I feel it would just be a wise idea if Hollywood wants to make an Americanized version of an anime/manga property, they need to do the following.

1) Not inform anyone that it was originally based on an anime.
2) Rename the movie to further separate it from it’s Japanese roots.
3) Keep as little from the story as humanly possible without changing the overall narrative of the story. Change the names, pacing, location, style of filming ect, but keep the narrative of the film intact.

Kinda like how Edge of Tomorrow was adapted from a godsdamned light novel but most people haven’t a bloody clue.

The quality control to not make a godawful film should come -after- the above. Because let’s face it, nobody is going to care if your movie is good if it is whitewashed to shit.

The alternative is to make 1:1 remake of a anime/manga property. Set it in Japan. Get more Asian or Asian-American talent and have them exclusively except for the token foreign character. Then of course, quality control to make sure it’s awful.