Your PC Probably Can't Run Assassin's Creed Unity

Ubisoft today revealed the system requirements for Assassin's Creed Unity's PC version, and it's all pretty normal stuff until you hit that GPU requirement.

At minimum, the game requires NVIDIA's GTX 680. A GPU which, at many retailers, costs more than an Xbox One or a PlayStation 4. Again, that's a minimum requirement.

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If you want the recommended experience, you'll be setting yourself back a few hundred bucks extra.

Sometimes being a console gamer isn't so bad, it would seem.

​Your PC Must Be Très Magnifique For Assassin's Creed Unity

The next big Assassin's Creed game, Unity, looks like it's going to be very pretty and very French. Both are good things in my book—though given that I can't actually speak French and my last name is "LeJacq," I might be a tad biased. There's one thing we can all agree on, however: its PC requirements are insane.

Here's the rundown of Unity's PC specs, as posted on Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed blog earlier today:

64-bit operating system

Required

Supported OS

Windows 7 SP1, Windows 8/8.1 (64bit versions only)

Processor

Minimum

Intel Core i5-2500K @ 3.3 GHz or AMD FX-8350 @ 4.0 GHz or AMD Phenom II x4 940 @ 3.0 GHz

Recommended

Intel Core i7-3770 @ 3.4 GHz or AMD FX-8350 @ 4.0 GHz or better

RAM

Minimum

6 GB

Recommended

8GB

Video Card

Minimum

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 or AMD Radeon HD 7970 (2 GB VRAM)

Recommended

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 or AMD Radeon R9 290X (3 GB VRAM)

DirectX

Version 11

Sound Card

DirectX 9.0c compatible sound card with latest drivers

Hard Drive Space

50 GB available space

Peripherals Supported

Windows-compatible keyboard and mouse required, optional controller

Multiplayer

256 kbps or faster broadband connection

Supported Video Cards at Time of Release

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 or better, GeForce GTX 700 series; AMD Radeon HD7970 or better, Radeon R9 200 series

Note: Laptop versions of these cards may work but are NOT officially supported.

50 GB of free hard drive space sounds like a lot, though that's fairly standard for Assassin's Creed-sized games at this point—as is the 8GB of RAM, and the base-level CPUs. What stands out to me are the minimum requirements for video cards. Making something like Nvidia's GeForce GTX 680 the base level requirements means that you'll pretty much have to be running a PC with a high-end GPU that came out in the past few years years. For a point of comparison, many of the season's other powerhouse titles like Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare or Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor have a base-level requirement of a GTS 450 or GTX 460 respectively.

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Lest we get caught in the illegible acronym-riddled weeds of graphics cards comparisons, the important thing to note here is that both of these other games say that you'll be able to play them with tech that's quite a bit older, and quite a bit cheaper, than what Assassin's Creed Unity is asking for. Granted, Unity is also a next-gen only game, and Ubisoft has promised that it will boast the biggest city ever seen in the series' history, so maybe the steep requirements will be worth it at the end of the day.

In either case, Unity isn't out in the wild yet, so (as always), take Ubisoft's statement about its recommended specs with a grain of salt. Come November, the PC gamers among us should also keep watchful eye on how Unity's performance is affected by whether its running on an AMD or Nvidia card, since Ubisoft inked a deal with the latter company that covers the new Assassin's Creed game—a deal that could prove to be fodder for yet another chapter in the card makers' ongoing tiff.

UPDATE (5:05 pm): Some people have observed that my use of "très magnifique" in the headline isn't technically correct. I intended for this to be a joke. Seeing as I'm a semi-French person with an exceedingly French name who doesn't actually speak the language, however, I should have been more careful in my presentation. I apologize for misleading or confusing people unnecessarily.

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To contact the author of this post, write to yannick.lejacq@kotaku.com or find him on Twitter at @YannickLeJacq.