In 1991, Nintendo published an adventure game (developed by Pax Softnica) in Japan for the Famicom Disk System called Time Twist. It is not the kind of game Nintendo would publish in 2016.

Hardcore Gaming played through it the other day, and say “it seems like they took a look at Nintendo of America’s censorship rules and set out to create a game that broke each and every one of them.”

It’s...look, why not just sit back and take a tour of some of the shit that goes down in this game as you meet a girl, fall in love, have your soul stolen, fight Hitler and are strung up by the KKK.

If you’re wondering why you’ve never heard of this game, despite it having been published by Nintendo, that’s probably because it looks like the company tried to brush it under the rug even as it was headed out the door. It was barely advertised in Japan, its cover art and manual (below) are blandly vague, and, most damning of all, it has never been re-released by a company that re-releases everything. Not even on Virtual Console.

Indeed, Time Twist ended up being the very last game physically released for the Famicom Disk System.



Because of all this, and unlike most other games published by Nintendo, there isn’t an English translation available.

So if you want to see for yourself what happens, you’ll have to sit through some Japanese playthroughs. Being a text adventure they’re not the most exciting thing in the world, though, so HG’s write-up might be a better place to head.

Oh, and a final fun fact: the game was composed by Hajime Hirasawa, who only ever worked on two games for Nintendo. This, and Star Fox.