Yam Hand? Jelly Man? BioShock Monsters That Might Have Been

If you thought BioShock had some creepy enemies, wait until you get a look at the enemy concepts that didn't make it into the game.

Irrational Games pulled out these five pieces of concept art from deep within its vaults, giving fans a taste of a BioShock that might have been. There seems to be a strong focus on disproportionate limbs and a human-insect hybrid theme that never reached fruition, though it did manage to help sell the game.

Check out the gallery for completely rational explanations for why a creature like the disgusting Jelly Man didn't make its way into BioShock.

March From the Vault [Irrational Games via Digg]

Illustration for article titled Yam Hand? Jelly Man? BioShock Monsters That Might Have Been
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Thug Aggressor

During one early stage of BioShock's production, oversized and disproportionate limbs were all the fashion.

Illustration for article titled Yam Hand? Jelly Man? BioShock Monsters That Might Have Been


Grub Mutant

Another take on the fused-parasite idea – different bug, same revolting results. This one is perhaps even more disturbing, when you realize that having a grub as thick as a telephone pole growing through the guy's chest isn't preventing him from having his gun locked and loaded. You have to wonder what's going through his head.

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Illustration for article titled Yam Hand? Jelly Man? BioShock Monsters That Might Have Been


Jelly Man

Perhaps the Jelly Man shows some long-term side effects of ADAM abuse. Maybe he's showing why humans and jellyfish aren't as genetically compatible as some Rapture scientists had envisioned. Or possibly this is what happens when a Splicer decides to mutate into a delightful breakfast spread. Who knows? Regardless, this guy melted before he could be incorporated into BioShock.

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Illustration for article titled Yam Hand? Jelly Man? BioShock Monsters That Might Have Been


Monster Bug

This is one of the more gruesome pieces of concept work to emerge during work on BioShock – a huge insect slowly growing from within a human being and taking over the physical form. And as sickening as this image is, its true power comes from what's implied: what was it like for the original person transitioning to this state of organic fusion? And what mash-up of man and bug is hidden under that cloth?

This visual was of great help in selling BioShock to publishers.

Illustration for article titled Yam Hand? Jelly Man? BioShock Monsters That Might Have Been
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Yam Hand

The "Yam Hand" character went through many iterations during the early development of BioShock. Artist Robb Waters had this to say about his creation: "One thing I liked about the character was his strange and unique head shape. It kind of made you wonder what the heck was going on under that dingy burlap sack."

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DISCUSSION

I for one would liked to have seen jelly man in action, rendered in all his wobbly, skin melting, gelatinous glory. He looks like he would absorb you.

Thats unpleasantness of a kind I would liked to have been present in Bioshock .

I realise that it is hard to create characters/enemies without fitting a certain archetype, I just feel that the design should come after the mechanic. It would be more organic in this respect.

By this I mean that what i suggested about a level of absorbtion or any form of attack style should come first, then the character should be built visually around this individual trait, which directly influences how you tackle the enemy or for that matter the game itself.

I think by getting these wonderfully talented artists to come up with a design of an enemy then fitting the attack around its physical features can be a mistake.

Not saying it always is but sometimes, which leads to the game getting stale.

I think in this industry so much is riding on it financially that tried and tested methods can sometimes trump originality.