Trying To Buy A Nintendo Switch In Japan: A Story In Four Photos

[Image: Nintendo]
[Image: Nintendo]
Kotaku EastEast is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Platinum Games developer Hideki Kamiya recently tried to get a Nintendo Switch. He documented the experience in four photos.

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As Kotaku previously reported, it’s not easy getting a Switch in Japan! Things have been so difficult that Nintendo apologized.

We have no idea if Kamiya has another Switch (or if there’s one at Platinum’s office), but yesterday he posted this photo to Instagram.

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The image shows the rules for buying a Switch at the Bic Camera in Kawasaki. This is actually for a raffle for the chance to buy a Switch, which is typical for popular items that are in short supply. People have to line up for this opportunity, and it’s not certain they’ll win the chance to purchase.

“To tell the truth,” Kamiya wrote, “I went to this sort of place today...”

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“And I got this sort of thing put on...”

The pink wrist band reads “Today only” and has the number 646. This is his raffle number. If he wins, he can buy a Switch.

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“And I passed the time at a place like this...”

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The results of the raffle, with the winning numbers announced.

“Because of this sort of thing...”

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“This happened...”

Better luck next time, Kamiya!


Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Originally from Texas, Ashcraft has called Osaka home since 2001. He has authored six books, including most recently, The Japanese Sake Bible.

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DISCUSSION

At this point Nintendo either has some very awful, awful marketing departments, who insist that short-handing supply lines is a good idea, or Nintendo really is that bad at managing production of their hardware.

& since they manage to produce under-powered hardware for the 3rd time, I guess the latter is true?