3,000 People Lined Up In Tokyo For 105 Nintendo Switch Consoles

[Image: Tokudane via Science Plus]
[Image: Tokudane via Science Plus]

Earlier this month in Tokyo’s Ikebukuro, around 3,000 people lined up at a retailer for a chance to buy one of 105 Switch consoles.

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As Game Memo and Science Plus report, the line was recently featured on Japanese morning show Tokudane. As with other Switch sales in Japan, people lined up to get a raffle number. Winners got the chance to buy one of the consoles. The others got nothing.

[Image: Tokudane via Game Memo]
[Image: Tokudane via Game Memo]
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This isn’t the first time the Switch has drawn a line of 3,000 people or more in Japan. The weekend before did just that. However, those retailers reportedly had more consoles with numbers like 300 or 500 consoles given.

[Image: Tokudane via Game Memo]
[Image: Tokudane via Game Memo]

Three thousand people trying to get one of 105 consoles ain’t good odds!

Tokudane also sent one of its reporters to 48 different stores in Tokyo to try to walk right in and buy a Switch.

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[Image: Tokudane via Game Memo]
[Image: Tokudane via Game Memo]

The console wasn’t available at any of them.

[Image: Tokudane via Game Memo]
[Image: Tokudane via Game Memo]
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People don’t have a choice but to line up. These two have been lining up nearly every week since May to buy one for their grandchild.

For the time being, expect the Nintendo Switch shortages to continue in Japan.


Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Originally from Texas, Ashcraft has called Osaka home since 2001. He has authored six books, including most recently, The Japanese Sake Bible.

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DISCUSSION

mrcaligula
MrCaligula

And yet Nintendo does nothing. It boggles the mind how they can have something that is a raving success and still manage to be on a mission to fuck it all up. It’s almost like they sit around in a board room in Kyoto and say “hey we have this hugely succesful product, let’s find ways not to sell it, we wouldn’t want to make too mcuh money after all. By the way, hav we cut back amiibo production to a tenth of demand yet? If not we need to get on that.”