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New PS4 Game Has A Very Stupid "Upgrade"

Illustration for article titled New PS4 Game Has A Very Stupid Upgrade

Driveclub is an upcoming PS4 racing game that, in the absence of a next-gen Gran Turismo, is something a lot of people are looking forward. Just be careful which version you buy.

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To help lure you in, a "free" copy of the game is being made available to PlayStation Plus subscribers. It's obviously scaled down, with only a few tracks and cars available, though it will let you try out every game mode.

If you like what you play and want the full package, you've got two options. There's a full copy being sold on both Blu-Ray and the PSN store which, at $60, will be your standard racing game. All the tracks, all the cars, you know the deal. You'll need a PS+ subscription for multiplayer, but everything else is yours so long as the disc (or your HDD) and your PS4 survive.

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Or, you can "upgrade" the free version to the PlayStation Plus edition, retaining all progress you've made. This is $10 cheaper, at $50. Like the disc edition, this will give you access to everything, only with a catch: it'll be tied to your PS+ account. Stop subscribing and you won't be able to access the content, even though you paid $50 for it.

So, um, yeah. Fuck that. Get the full version or don't get it at all. Below is a trailer that tries to explain all this, and I promise you, it is not satire.

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DISCUSSION

"The all-digital future will always protect your purchases."

...yeah. We old folks squalling about physical media from our rest homes (and the porches from which we threaten the kids on our lawn) sound really out of touch now, don't we?

This is the first foray into a larger infringement on consumer rights. Such erosion is always gradual—and it's always billed as being more convenient/better for the consumer.

That we've failed to learn from about fifty years or so of this stuff (in terms of visual technology) is a sad, sad commentary on our collective memory and ability to process evidence outside of what appeals to our immediate interest.

*returns to prune juice and Matlock reruns*