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Japan Won WW2, And Now Rules America With Giant Mechs

Illustration for article titled Japan Won WW2, And Now Rules America With Giant Mechs
Fine ArtFine ArtFine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you’re in the business and have some art you’d like to share, get in touch!

United States of Japan is an upcoming novel that the author says is a “spiritual successor” to Philip K Dick’s classic The Man In The High Castle. Only, instead of the Japanese and Germans sharing the US in the 1960s, Japan is the sole oppressor, and they’re lording it over America with an army of giant mechs.

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I’m posting this here in Fine Art because to accompany the novel, author Peter Tieryas got John Liberto—one of the best game artists in the business—to provide some illustrations, including the cover shot. And I thought they were badass enough to share here.

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To see the larger pics in all their glory (or, if they’re big enough, so you can save them as wallpaper), click on the “expand” button in the top-left corner.

Fine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you’re in the business and have some concept, environment, promotional or character art you’d like to share, drop us a line!


Illustration for article titled Japan Won WW2, And Now Rules America With Giant Mechs
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Illustration for article titled Japan Won WW2, And Now Rules America With Giant Mechs
Illustration for article titled Japan Won WW2, And Now Rules America With Giant Mechs
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Illustration for article titled Japan Won WW2, And Now Rules America With Giant Mechs
Illustration for article titled Japan Won WW2, And Now Rules America With Giant Mechs

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DISCUSSION

The art is incredible.

That said, the speculative fiction that informs The Man in the High Castle is mostly grounded in historical precedent (not all of it—and I’m not about to get into the quality of the writing itself).

This appears to be, “Japan won, and they totally use mechs, because anime.”

In most speculative historical fiction, whenever the Third Reich is featured (outside of Wolfenstein, obviously), its actions and abilities are logical extensions of where the asshat Nazis were at the time before the turning point of WW II. The progression makes some small amount of sense.

For WW II era Japan to go from where they were to, “LOOK, MECHS,” seems a little lazy, narratively speaking.