Sometimes I’ll remember a game series that disappeared into the ether that used to be a huge part of my life. With so many remasters and ports popping up, it got me thinking about those games that I would love to see make a comeback.

Whether they’re the wacky sports games of the EA Big era, or old games that are ripe for the battle royale treatment, everyone’s got games that they miss. If we’re lucky, we’ll get games from developers who feel the same way and carry the torch like Shovel Knight or Earthfall. I sat down with Kotaku’s Tim Rogers and Ethan Gach to chat about which games we want to see make their glorious return, and the ones that tried but missed the mark.

Watch the video above or check out an excerpt here:

Tim: What if we gave other people a shot at making a game. Not everybody has the clout to make something like Shovel Knight and put it out. Maybe they can just get jobs at Microsoft and Rare.

Paul: Like Sonic Mania. Let the fans who studied the games, modded and made their own versions of it—let them curate their own thing.

Ethan: Twisted Metal! Twisted Metal also needs to come back. The most fun thing to do in Rocket League, other than miss goals, is to just ride as fast as you can at another player when you’re losing by four and just know that you owned them for a hot second.

Paul: It’s like dunking on them.

Ethan: Right, it’s like, “Oh, you thought you won but look, your car just blew up.” But… if I can do that in a battle royale setting as a dude who has giant wheels for arms, that would be even better.

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Tim: Rocket League proved to the esports competitive games community that MOBAs and FPSes weren’t the only two types of competitive games that people will play like crazy online. And battle royale games came out after that, and that was a relatively new concept, so I think game developers and publishers are now open to the idea of there being more types of competitive games. I would not be surprised at all to see a car combat game come out. Maybe it’s not Twisted Metal, but independent developers can now do stuff on that level.


Watch the full episode to hear more. Be sure to check out Viewpoints every Tuesday, and if you want to watch it on YouTube, here’s a playlist.