Dragon Ball Z Toy Shows Why Fan Art Is Tricky

Illustration for article titled Dragon Ball Z Toy Shows Why Fan Art Is Tricky
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This is not official art. It’s fan art. Pixiv member Kanon Kamishima created the piece and uploaded it in 2013. This week, similar art was spotted on a Dragon Ball Z toy. The artist apparently had no idea.

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The art depicts Super Saiyan God Goku. It is not official, but has been widely circulated online as a DBZ wallpaper. My assumption is that it was mistakenly thought to be official.

This Dragon Ball Z medal was previewed in the most recent Saikyo Jump manga.

Illustration for article titled Dragon Ball Z Toy Shows Why Fan Art Is Tricky

[Photo: 614_HSO]

When asked about the collectible toy, Kamishima replied, “This is the first I’ve seen this. I wasn’t asked about this. The heck is this?”

The medal, which is used for spinning tops, hasn’t gone on sale. Yet. But if it does (I doubt it will), Kamishima did mention putting in a compensation claim.

Illustration for article titled Dragon Ball Z Toy Shows Why Fan Art Is Tricky
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What’s tricky is that while Kamishima created the image (or, at least, a similar one), the artist does not own the copyright to Goku’s likeness nor is the artist responsible for said likeness. But Kamishima did create the image. See? Tricky.

Top photo: 神島かのん

To contact the author of this post, write to bashcraftATkotaku.com or find him on Twitter@Brian_Ashcraft.

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Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

DISCUSSION

shippoyasha
Shippoyasha

I really do wish fanartists gets compensated as a matter of course in these kinds of cases. If someone works on an art, no matter the copyrights, that work put into it should factor in somehow. Though I guess it can be tricky with some artists who are paid on commission by fans as well. And a bunch of doujinshi/fan-artists often are hired by major companies to do work too, so there’s always this synergy between the semi-pro scene and the actual company scene.