Sega’s ill-fated Saturn console is much more loved today than it was when it was released in 1994. Game collectors prize the exclusive rarities in its library. But collecting it can be a total nightmare.

Good news: It’s a new episode of Complete In Box, our series in which we look back at classic games through the lens of all the stuff they came with—the box, the manual, or in the case of Sega Saturn games, their incredibly fragile, oversized plastic jewel cases.

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Bad news: It’s the series finale of Complete In Box, as I am leaving Kotaku today. Thanks to all of you who supported this series, and my work here, for the last few years. It’s been a pleasure getting to talk about old video games with you.

Features Editor, Kotaku. Japanese curry aficionado. Author of the books Power-Up: How Japanese Video Games Gave the World an Extra Life and Final Fantasy V from Boss Fight Books.

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DISCUSSION

staindgrey
staindgrey

I’ve been collecting Saturn games since 2008, and I’m really glad I spent the money on some of these before the prices skyrocketed even further.

In my collection I’ve got Panzer Dragoon Saga, Shining Force III, Magic Knight Rayearth (a surprisingly funny, wonderful game, and I haven’t even watched the show it’s based on), Deep Fear, Bomberman Saturn and quite a number of other games. And all of them have seemingly doubled in price since when I found them.

It’s something I know I spent too much money on over the years, but I’ve convinced myself it’s fine because of how much profit I could make if I ever had to resell them. Which, hopefully I never do, but. It’s nice to have a backup plan?

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