Beat Takeshi Hates Games, Computers And Email (What About Twitter?)

Illustration for article titled Beat Takeshi Hates Games, Computers And Email (What About Twitter?)

In 1986, Japanese comedian and actor Beat Takeshi designed a video game. A very hard video game.

Dubbed Takeshi's Challenge and released by Taito, the game defines video game masochism. In Takeshi's Challenge, players must sing karaoke into the Famicom controller mic. After they do that successfully, every character in the bar tries to kick the crap out of your character! (That's if you do it successfully!) Then, they have to wait for one hour! And when players finally reach Beat, they need to hit him twenty thousand times to defeat him.

Illustration for article titled Beat Takeshi Hates Games, Computers And Email (What About Twitter?)
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Takeshi made the game because he apparently hates video games. Japanese gamers, however, dug his brand of video game masochism and snapped up 800,000 copies of the game. He's since gone on to become one of the giants of Japanese entertainment and has achieved worldwide fame for acting and directing motion pictures like Sonatine and Hana-Bi.

A French book Kitano par Kitano, which is getting a Japanese version, features a collection of interviews with Takeshi. "I hate computers," he says in Kitano par Kitano. "I also hate email. I have a cell phone in my car, but I've never answered it."

"And Twitter, it's okay for horsing around and playing, but I don't get the stupidity of using it as a news source," Takeshi says. "News, you can get that walking down the street. Even if you watch TV as little as possible, I still think you can get correct info."

Illustration for article titled Beat Takeshi Hates Games, Computers And Email (What About Twitter?)
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According to Takeshi, people today are constantly searching for information. Because of this, they think the information they find is a big deal — even though, he says, it isn't really. Takeshi notes that it really depends on who is releasing the information. So advertising companies can create and disseminate information. "Everyone is like cattle," Takeshi says, "being moved from pen to pen."

Takeshi also goes on to criticize young Japanese women for putting on make-up on the train, comparing it to "a drunkard taking a piss on the street". Fellow entertainment giant, Hayao Miyazaki recently lambasted using the "game machine-type" iPad as "masturbation", and derided the use of cell phones on trains. He then told kids to get off his lawn and called the cops.

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Which brings me to: Beat Takeshi and Hayao Miyazaki take public transportation?

Illustration for article titled Beat Takeshi Hates Games, Computers And Email (What About Twitter?)
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【北野武 ニッポンの問題点を語る】(上)電車の中の化粧なんて、酔っぱらいの立ち小便と同じ [MSN産経ニュース] [Pic]

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DISCUSSION

farmboyinjapan-old
FarmboyinJapan

I once saw Hayao Miyazaki on the Shinkansen....

The dichotomy between Beat Takeshi in the west vs the east is absolutely astounding.

In America, he is known as this semi-underground director of smart yakuza films.

But in Japan, he comes across as an abominable fame whore, who will stoop to any low to get a cheap laugh.

While Americans watching Brother or Hanabi and think he is some kind of modern day Japanese badass....to us living in Japan, you can turn on the TV any night of the week, and see him traipsing around, making an absolute fool out of himself. Why just tonight, he was on TV, dressed in a full deer costume that shot steam out of its nose. Very rarely will you see the man present himself with a shred of dignity or class.....99.9% of the time he is on TV, he is in outfits that would make Porter Wagoner look underdressed.

The juxtapositions within the man are striking to say the least. He'll get on TV one night, and talk about how he is "embarassed about modern Japan"....and yet an hour later, he will be on a different program, conforming to the exact stereotype that just an hour ago he was railing against.

All the while, he has his own show in which he incessantly rags on modern young japanese males for "being too heavily influenced by female values."

Its as if Steven Speilberg, between filming Shindler's List and Private Ryan was moonlighting as a judge on The Bachelor, and as a contestant on Fear Factor.

Beat Takeshi and Hayao Miyazaki should make the "we hate what you love" club.