Tokyo's Secret, Members-Only Nintendo-Themed Bar

[Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]

To get into the private Nintendo-themed bar “84,” you gotta either be a member or know someone. Its address isn’t listed, and the establishment is strictly card-carrying members only. No wonder the door makes a Zelda secret sound when opened.

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Website Tofugu recently profiled 84, which is read as “Hashi.” The name is a wordplay on the owner’s last name Hashimoto, chopsticks (“hashi” in Japanese), and World 8-4 (“hachi” is eight and “shi” is four).

The bar doesn’t have a sign on the street, and you’d have to know where it’s located to find the spot.

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[Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]
Illustration for article titled Tokyos Secret, Members-Only Nintendo-Themed Barem/em

“To become an official member, associate members are required to come to 84 five times as well as do two ‘meetings,’” Hashimoto told Tofugu. “By that I mean chat and drink with me and another official member. I just want to get to know them. Then, they can become official members and get an official member card. See, they’re shaped like Famicom cartridges!”

[Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]
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According to Hashimoto, around half of 84's members are game developers, while the other half are comedians, manga artists, musicians, wrestlers and some regular folks. From the sound of it, this bar is a place game creators can go and chill.

The only people Hashimoto has refused as members are folks who’ve been too excited to see game devs and wanted to bother and pester them, instead of leaving them alone.

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The bar is filled with autographs and memorabilia. Not everything is Nintendo related!

The Legend of Zelda series executive producer Eiji Aonuma drew Link using chopsticks. [Image: Tofugu]
The Legend of Zelda series executive producer Eiji Aonuma drew Link using chopsticks. [Image: Tofugu]
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A Kirby plate signed by Masahiro Sakurai. [Image: Tofugu]
A Kirby plate signed by Masahiro Sakurai. [Image: Tofugu]
A drawing by Takashi Tezuka.  [Image: Tofugu]
A drawing by Takashi Tezuka. [Image: Tofugu]
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Shigeru Miyamoto, however, wouldn’t draw Mario using chopsticks.  [Image: Tofugu]
Shigeru Miyamoto, however, wouldn’t draw Mario using chopsticks. [Image: Tofugu]
Dragon Quest creator Yuji Horii drew a Slime, writing “Life is role playing.”  [Image: Tofugu]
Dragon Quest creator Yuji Horii drew a Slime, writing “Life is role playing.” [Image: Tofugu]
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Here are signatures and drawings from Game Freak devs.  [Image: Tofugu]
Here are signatures and drawings from Game Freak devs. [Image: Tofugu]
Mother creator Shigesato Itoi.  [Image: Tofugu]
Mother creator Shigesato Itoi. [Image: Tofugu]
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Koji Kondo signed sheet music.  [Image: Tofugu]
Koji Kondo signed sheet music. [Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]
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[Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]
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[Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]
[Image: Tofugu]
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Told you everything wasn’t Nintendo themed. [Image: Tofugu]
Told you everything wasn’t Nintendo themed. [Image: Tofugu]

For more, check out Tofugu’s article right here.


Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Originally from Texas, Ashcraft has called Osaka home since 2001. He has authored six books, including most recently, The Japanese Sake Bible.

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DISCUSSION

So note to self..if ever in Japan and see a game dev, be chill as fuck.