Even Angry Birds Can Spy On You, According To NSA LeakS

Your phone, your e-mail, your Skype calls... just about everything you use is leaking information these days. Including Angry Birds, according to a new report by ProPublica and The New York Times.

This info comes from a close look at the much-discussed Edward Snowden documents, which reportedly reveal that spy agencies are snagging all sorts of data from the apps on our phones: "address books, buddy lists, phone logs and the geographic data embedded in photos when someone sends a post to the mobile versions of Facebook, Flickr, LinkedIn, Twitter and other services," according to the report.

Although the Snowden documents don't say whether spy agencies have pilfered data from games like Angry Birds, they do make it clear that our apps are capable of storing and sharing personal information, including age, sex, and even marital status.

For their part, the N.S.A. is denying wrongdoing: "N.S.A. does not profile everyday Americans as it carries out its foreign intelligence mission," they told ProPublica. "Because some data of U.S. persons may at times be incidentally collected in N.S.A.'s lawful foreign intelligence mission, privacy protections for U.S. persons exist across the entire process."

For a thorough look and breakdown on all this stuff, check out the full report. Or just destroy every electronic device you own and move into the forest.