The New DMCA Rules Don't Go Far Enough

Decrypting copyrighted materials is, according to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, an illegal act. Yesterday, the Library of Congress issued a set of exemptions to the DMCA’s decryption ban, which many outlets, including Gizmodo, hailed as “victories” and “big wins.” They’re not. At best, the new rules allow… »10/28/15 2:07pm10/28/15 2:07pm


YouTuber: Twitch Streamers Should Have Seen Music Crackdown Coming

Gamers have been up in arms ever since Twitch began to enforce harsher restrictions against users playing copyrighted music in their videos. Hovering around the edges of this chorus of unpleasantly surprised voices, meanwhile, are all the YouTube broadcasters who are still reeling from the crackdown they all… »8/07/14 3:00pm8/07/14 3:00pm

Candy Crush Makers Remove a Game Accused of Being a Blatant Copy

In the world of flash games, derivatives vastly outnumber original concepts, so the charge someone copied a game is quite common. But the makers of a Pac-Man-style game in 2009 say they have an email proving that King, the outfit trademarking words like "candy" and "saga," ordered a developer to directly copy their… »1/25/14 2:00pm1/25/14 2:00pm

YouTube's Copyright Crackdown: Everything You Need To Know

We're in the second week of a YouTube copyright enforcement crackdown whose most visible effects have been on the video gaming community. Each day turns up a new example of a video getting thrown in YouTube jail on a ridiculous technicality. The situation seems to defy common sense, but we'll try to explain it in… »12/18/13 5:00pm12/18/13 5:00pm

Angry Joe, the YouTube game critic who weighed in on the wave of copyright enforcement that snagged

Angry Joe, the YouTube game critic who weighed in on the wave of copyright enforcement that snagged several of his videos, has offered a followup perspective. So has another YouTuber who believes large "multi channel networks" share in the blame. We've added both videos to the original post. »12/13/13 3:58pm12/13/13 3:58pm

Game Critic Says YouTube Copyright Policy Threatens His Livelihood [Update]

Three of "Angry Joe" Vargas' 10 most-viewed videos on YouTube, and dozens of others, have been flagged by YouTube's controversial "content ID" system, meaning the independent games critic and personality can't earn any advertising money from them. Last night, Angry Joe responded, very much in character. »12/12/13 3:30pm12/12/13 3:30pm