Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Isamu Sasagawa just might be the greatest towel artist in Japan, if not the entire Earth.

What is towel art? It's folding towels to resemble things, whether that's animals or figures from pop culture. (And yes, some people like to fold dicks with towels. Shame on them!)

If you've stayed at Walt Disney World, you might know firsthand about towel art. Among its housekeeping staff, Disney has numerous towel artists. And they're quite good.

But there's something so inventive about Sasagawa's towel creations. He's not just folding animals, but creating all sorts of stuff: baby bottles and women's laps, characters like Totoro or Gremlins, or even the Rolling Stones kiss mark.

Sasagawa has written books about this "oshibori art" (in Japanese, "oshibori" or おしぼり are the small wet hand towels you are given before a meal) as well as created an iOS app. Have a look at his creations below:

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Japanese Towel Art to Delight and Amaze

Here, you can see the how-to for the above creation, which is a towel version of Maetel, the mysterious blonde woman in classic anime Galaxy Express 999. (In the video, he's "singing" the steps in Japanese.)

So simple. So clever. Very cool. Bravo.

ササブログ [Ameblo via まとめ]

Isamu Sasagawa [YouTube]

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