Advertisement

The Real Story Of Apollo 17... And Why We Never Went Back To The Moon

On December 11, 1972, Apollo 17 touched down on the Moon. This was not only our final Moon landing, but the last time we left low Earth orbit. With the successful launch of the Orion capsule, NASA is finally poised to go further again. So it’s important to remember how we got to the Moon — and why we stopped going.

The first spacecraft that feels from the future will blast off soon

SpaceX just got its first crewed spaceship contract from NASA for the Crew Dragon spacecraft and it’s set to bring us back to space on American spaceships after so many years without. Along with the Boeing Starliner, the Crew Dragon will start making crewed space flights in 2017. For reference, the last flight of the…

Watch a 10-engine drone transform from a helicopter into a plane

NASA’s Greased Lightning GL-10 is a beast of a drone (it has 10 engines!) that’s the closest thing we have to a Transformer in real life. It can flip itself into a helicopter and then fly like an airplane and then revert back to helicopter mode. It’s awesome seeing the wings tilt back and forth as it changes gears.

The Apollo 13 astronauts and crew are now immortalized as Lego minifigs

If you didn’t live through the drama that was Apollo 13, you’ve probably seen the movie starring Tom Hanks. And even though the mission never made it to the moon, the Apollo 13 astronauts and crew are still considered heroes for getting back to earth safely. So of course they deserve to be immortalized as Lego minifigs

Advertisement

Boeing and SpaceX Will Share NASA's $6.8 Billion Space Taxi Program

NASA just announced a critical component of Launch America, the country's highly anticipated next chapter in human spaceflight. The organization confirmed in a press conference today that Boeing and SpaceX will split the $6.8 billion "space taxi" contract, with $4.2 billion going to Boeing and $2.6 billion to SpaceX.

Watch NASA Test Its Rocket-Powered "Flying Saucer" Live On io9!

After scrapping all of its planned test launches earlier this month, NASA will today attempt to release its Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) from the edge of space. The rocket-powered, flying saucer–shaped landing vehicle will then return to Earth on a dramatic path through Hawaii's skies. Watch it live, here!