Saying Goodbye to a Three-Year-Old Minecraft World

Generally for Minecraft players, the more time they spend in their world, the more attached they'll be. I don't tend to get too attached because I play in several-hour spurts, usually moving on to a new file each time. But what if you decide to move on from a world that's been with you for three years?

One such player, redditor taukarrie, started playing the game in February of 2011—back when squids, cakes, dyes and bones were all wildly new additions to Minecraft. taukariie played on a private survival server, eventually founding Redlake Vale, the subject of the clip below.

Redlake Vale continued to exist through the years and updates by way of MCEdit, which was used to directly transplant the ever-growing plot of land unto each iteration of the server. But, as taukariie says, Redlake Vale was starting to show its age, so it was time to let it go:

I could easily continue if I wanted to. It just feels like time to move on. I've got so many resources that there's no more challenges. And so much of the legacy architecture and Redstone work is obsolete. I've even unlocked so many villager trades that even diamond tools and armor are trivial

Also, after so long my building style has evolved and there is so much of this world that I would've done differently I just want a fresh start. With banners, new wood objects, and all the new blocks 1.8 is looking like a good time to reset.

And hence, a fifteen-minute video with Final Fantasy music and a lot of locations. It's powerful stuff when you consider the background: the sheer amount of work that went into building this thing, and all the memories that were made there.

And so taukariie will start anew on the server, but, like in the case of X, a copy of Redlake Vale will be kept around locally. Because it's always important to preserve one's memories.

A Heartfelt Goodbye to the Vale [Tau Karrie@YouTube, via r/minecraft]

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