Bad Tattoo Baffles Japanese Soccer Fans

When not watching one of the most boring World Cup matches in recent memory, Japanese soccer fans were watching the tattoo on the arm of Greece's Theofanis Gekas. The tattoo fail, that is.

As noted on Hachima, the tattoo reads "寒冷殺人魔" (kanrei satsujin ma) in Japanese, which literally translates as "cold (weather) murder demon." The problem is that the kanji used here for "cold" (寒冷) refers to weather, as in "chilly" or "frigidity" or "cold" as in a "cold front." In Chinese, the tattoo doesn't make sense, either, and the "cold" here refers to weather. This tattoo is gibberish.

Ironically, this isn't the first time Japan has noticed Gekas' tattoo. The same thing happened in 2010, during the last World Cup. Maybe the country will notice it again during the next one, too!

Bad Tattoo Baffles Japanese Soccer Fans

Though, as you can see in this new pic from Getty, Gekas is sticking with his tattoo and hasn't covered it up. Yet.

Scuttlebutt online says Gekas' tattoo is supposed to mean "Cool Killer." At least in Japan, the correct way to write that would be "Reikoku na Satsujinki" (冷酷な殺人鬼), which means "Coldhearted Cutthroat," "reikoku" (冷酷) meaning "cruel" or "cold-hearted" and "satsujinki" (殺人鬼) meaning a "bloodthirsty killer." And in Chinese, "cold-blooded killer" would be 冷血杀人魔.

Sadly, what Gekas has now is hardly badass, and it makes it seem like Gekas is murdering winter weather. Maybe he is! You know, causing global warming, messing up the climate. If so, then, he is truly to be feared.

No wonder Japanese Twitter users are miffed. But you know what miffed about? Why Japan couldn't score, playing against a team with only ten players on the field. Forget kanji screw ups, now that shit is truly baffling.

W杯】ギリシャ代表ゲカス選手、「cool killer」という意味で漢字の入れ墨を頼んだ結果悲しみを背負うことにwwwww [はちま起稿]

Top photo: deathash13

To contact the author of this post, write to bashcraftATkotaku.com or find him on Twitter @Brian_Ashcraft.

Kotaku East is your slice of Asian internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.